Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First Successful Treatment For Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury In Rats

Date:
October 13, 2007
Source:
Louisiana State University Health Science Center
Summary:
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved spatial learning and memory in a model of chronic traumatic brain injury. HBOT is the use of greater than atmospheric pressure oxygen as a pharmacologic treatment of basic disease processes/states and their diseases.

A research team led by Dr. Paul Harch, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans and Director of the LSU Hyperbaric Medicine Fellowship Program, has published findings that show hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) improved spatial learning and memory in a model of chronic traumatic brain injury.

HBOT is the use of greater than atmospheric pressure oxygen as a pharmacologic treatment of basic disease processes/states and their diseases.

The research team adapted a well-known acute animal model of focal traumatic brain injury to chronic brain injury to evaluate the ability of low-pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to improve behavioral and neurobiological outcomes.

The 64 rat subjects were divided into three groups -- an untreated control group (22), an HBOT group treated with a human protocol (19), and a group treated with sham hyperbaric pressurization (23). The subjects were tested pre and then 31-33 days post HBOT using the Morris Water Task ( MWT), a behavioral test which measures learning and memory. The HBOT group received low pressure twice daily therapy, and the sham-treated normobaric air group the identical schedule of air treatments using a sham hyperbaric pressurization. All groups were subsequently retested in the MWT.

Post experiment, blood pressure density was measured in the brain and was correlated with MWT performance. HBOT caused an increase in vascular density in the injured hippoca mpus (p < 0.001) and an associated improvement in spatial learning (p < 0.001) compared to the control groups. The increased vascular density and improved MWT in the HBOT group were highly correlated (p < 0.001).

In conclusion, a 40-day series of 80 low-pressure HBOTs caused an increase in vascular density and an associated improvement in cognitive function. These findings reaffirm the clinical experience of HBOT-treated patients with chronic traumatic brain injury and write the authors, represent the first demonstration of noninvasive improvement of chronic brain injury in an animal model.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disorder of major public health significance. According to the National Institutes of Health, each year in the United States alone there are 100 new cases/100,000 population and 52,000 deaths. Most patients survive and add to an increasing prevalence of chronic TBI, estimated at 2.5 - 6.5 million individuals in 1998. Direct and indirect costs have been estimated at $56 billion/year in 1995. Unfortunately, there is no cure for chronic TBI and only a few previous studies suggest effectiveness under limited conditions. These new findings could hold enormous significance not only for the million+ who sustain TBI from falls, motor vehicle accidents and assaults in this country each year, but also for returning US military veterans.

The paper is reported in the October 12, 2007 issue of Brain Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana State University Health Science Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Louisiana State University Health Science Center. "First Successful Treatment For Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury In Rats." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011153342.htm>.
Louisiana State University Health Science Center. (2007, October 13). First Successful Treatment For Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury In Rats. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011153342.htm
Louisiana State University Health Science Center. "First Successful Treatment For Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury In Rats." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011153342.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins