Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Long-acting Inhaled Therapies, Supplemental Oxygen, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Benefit COPD Patients, Report States

Date:
November 3, 2007
Source:
American College of Physicians
Summary:
Clinical practice guideline on diagnosing and treating stable COPD, a progressive lung disease involving the airways and lung tissue, resulting in a gradual loss of lung function, typically as a result of smoking have been released. COPD affects more than 5 percent of the adult population in the US and is the fourth leading cause of death. The term COPD includes both emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today released a new clinical practice guideline on diagnosing and treating stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a slowly progressive lung disease involving the airways and lung tissue, resulting in a gradual loss of lung function, typically as a result of smoking.

COPD affects more than 5 percent of the adult population in the United States and is the fourth leading cause of death and twelfth leading cause of illness. The symptoms of COPD range from chronic cough and wheezing to more severe symptoms such as shortness of breath and significant activity limitation.

The term COPD includes both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Physicians often use the broader term COPD, since affected patients frequently have components of both processes.

The guideline offers six recommendations, including:

  • In patients with respiratory symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, spirometry (a simple test in which a person blows into a machine that measures the amount of gas breathed into it over a period of time) should be performed to diagnose airflow obstruction. Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in asymptomatic individuals.
  • Treatment of stable COPD should be reserved for patients who have respiratory symptoms and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) less than 60 percent predicted, as documented by spirometry.
  • For symptomatic patients with COPD and FEV1 less than 60 percent predicted, clinicians should prescribe long-acting inhaled -agonists, long-acting inhaled anticholinergics, or inhaled corticosteroids.
  • Clinicians should prescribe oxygen therapy in patients with COPD and insufficient levels of oxygen in the circulating blood while resting.

"The evidence does not support using spirometry as a diagnostic strategy for individuals not reporting respiratory symptoms," said Steven Weinberger, MD, FACP, Senior Vice President, Medical Education and Publishing at ACP, and an author of the guideline. "However, adding spirometry to clinical examinations for individuals with respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath, has demonstrated benefits."

The guideline is based on a systematic evidence review of published studies by Timothy J. Wilt, MD, MPH, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-sponsored Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center evidence report.

"It is important that all individuals with COPD stop smoking to prevent progression of the disease," Dr. Weinberger said. "Of course, even smokers without COPD should stop smoking to decrease the risk of both COPD and lung cancer. It's never too late to stop."

The target audience for the guideline is all physicians and the target patient population is all adults with COPD.

The following will be published in the in the Nov. 6, 2007, edition of Annals of Internal Medicine and will be available to the public at http://www.annals.org:

Reference: Diagnosis and Management of Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline from the American College of Physicians, Management of Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review for a Clinical Practice Guideline is published in the Nov. 6, 2007, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Physicians. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Physicians. "Long-acting Inhaled Therapies, Supplemental Oxygen, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Benefit COPD Patients, Report States." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071031164826.htm>.
American College of Physicians. (2007, November 3). Long-acting Inhaled Therapies, Supplemental Oxygen, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Benefit COPD Patients, Report States. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071031164826.htm
American College of Physicians. "Long-acting Inhaled Therapies, Supplemental Oxygen, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Benefit COPD Patients, Report States." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071031164826.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins