Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Childhood Sleep-disordered Breathing Disproportionately Affects Obese And African-Americans

Date:
January 2, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery
Summary:
Sleep-disordered breathing, which can include various sleep behaviors ranging in severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea, disproportionately affects children who are overweight and African-American, according to a new study published in the December 2007 edition of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. Obstructive sleep apnea can pose serious health threats, including hypertension and higher risk for cardiac disease.

As the obesity epidemic grows in the U.S., doctors are discovering more and more far reaching health concerns for overweight children. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), which can include various sleep behaviors ranging in severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), disproportionately affects children who are overweight and African- American, according to a new study published in the December 2007 edition of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can pose serious health threats, including hypertension and higher risk for cardiac disease.

Related Articles


Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond studied 299 children, ages 2 to 18 years old. The principal study group consisted of children scheduled to undergo adenotonsillectomy for treatment of SDB. The control group consisted of children presenting to a primary care pediatric clinic for well-child visits on randomly selected dates.

Each child's chart was reviewed for demographic data that included age, gender, race/ethnicity, height, and weight. Body mass index was calculated from the height and weight of each child.

Results showed that 46 percent of children scheduled for surgery for SDB were overweight, compared with 33 percent in the control group. This ratio is far less than would be expected in the general population, where obesity in children with SDB would occur approximately ten times more commonly than obesity in the general pediatric population. A possible explanation for the smaller ratio of obesity in children with SDB compared to controls, is that there may be a lack of awareness of the link between obesity and SDB among primary healthcare providers and caregivers.

Results also showed that children who are African-American and have SDB were more likely to be obese.

"The need to promote awareness of the association between SDB and obesity, particularly in African- American children and adolescents, among educators, caregivers, primary care providers, and the general public cannot be overemphasized," said study lead author Emily F. Rudnick, MD.

Authors noted that in general there is clearly a complex role that race and ethnicity play in predicting obesity and SDB, and encouraged additional research into this public health issue.

Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery is the official scientific journal of the American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). The study's authors are Emily F. Rudnick, MD, Jonathan S. Walsh, BS, Mark C. Hampton, PhD, and Ron B. Mitchell, MD.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. "Childhood Sleep-disordered Breathing Disproportionately Affects Obese And African-Americans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071201082255.htm>.
American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. (2008, January 2). Childhood Sleep-disordered Breathing Disproportionately Affects Obese And African-Americans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071201082255.htm
American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. "Childhood Sleep-disordered Breathing Disproportionately Affects Obese And African-Americans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071201082255.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins