Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New 3-D Real-time Heart 'Mapping' Technology Improves Precision And Patient Safety

Date:
December 13, 2007
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
A new ultrasound technology has now been introduced to guide ablation of atrial fibrillation, offering potential improvements in both the precision and safety of this therapy. AF is the most common type of heart rhythm disorder. With the new software imaging technology, the CartoSound™ Image Integration Module and SoundStar™ 3D Catheter, physicians now are able to visualize and create a whole new kind of "map" of the heart in order to perform atrial ablation.

Specialists at Loyola University Health System are the first in the nation to use new ultrasound technology to guide ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), offering potential improvements in both the precision and safety of this therapy. AF is the most common type of heart rhythm disorder.

Related Articles


In treating AF with catheter ablation, cardiac electrophysiologists traditionally use standard X-ray technology to guide proper placement of radiofrequency energy to ablate the tissues (cause small areas of scarring) in the heart responsible for starting and maintaining the irregular rhythm. These physicians also generate a computer reconstruction of the heart’s interior, often with the help of pictures obtained from CT or MRI scans done prior to the procedure. While helpful, these reconstructions can be time consuming, difficult to produce, and expose patients to additional radiation.

With the newly installed software imaging technology, the CartoSound™ Image Integration Module and SoundStar™ 3D Catheter, Loyola physicians now are able to visualize and create a whole new kind of “map” of the heart in order to perform atrial ablation. They use ultrasound imaging to produce pictures of the heart during the ablation procedure. The ultrasound technique produces three-dimensional images of the heart’s anatomy within a few minutes at the bedside, and allows real-time, simultaneous monitoring of catheter position and orientation during the procedure, improving both precision and patient safety.

Dr. David Wilber, professor of cardiovascular sciences, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, said he and his team have used the new technology with 20 patients with “excellent results.

While the previous method provided three-dimensional images of the heart, they often lacked sufficient detail. Incorporating CT pictures images from a scan obtained several days earlier provided more detail, but it was difficult to accurately register the older picture to the precise orientation of the heart during the procedure.

“The new 3-D ultrasound images provide a very detailed view of the heart, and most importantly, they reflect the condition of the heart during the procedure. Since the image is generated by the same computer program that tracks the location of the catheter, the points of interest match very closely,” Dr Wilber explained. “This allows very accurate placement of lesions (the ‘scarring’) to assure elimination of the arrhythmia, while avoiding injury to important nearby structures, such as the pulmonary veins or the esophagus. We can now image these structures with unprecedented accuracy continuously during the procedure.”

“Patients experience shorter X-ray times, and physicians can create more precise ‘heart maps’ for the ablation,” Dr. Wilber noted. He added that “the technology also allows us to map both the right and left sides of the heart from the right atrium (right upper heart chamber) before we must move into the left side to complete the actual ablation (‘scarring’) procedure.” Dr. Wilber explained that with less time spent in the left side of the heart, the patient has a decreased risk of having a blood clot form during the procedure that could lead to a stroke.

Overall procedure time is decreased by more than 30 minutes, Dr. Wilber added, and the need for additional imaging procedures prior to ablation may be completely eliminated. “This is real breakthrough in making these procedures safer, more precise and less taxing on the patient. We are extremely excited about being able to bring these benefits to patients here at Loyola,” he said.AF is the most common irregular heart rhythm disorder in the U.S., affecting about 2.2 million Americans. Approximately 160,000 new cases are diagnosed in the U.S. alone each year.

AF may be related to coronary artery disease, thyroid disease, high blood pressure, or other structural heart defects, but often has no detectable cause. If left untreated, AF can cause structural heart changes that diminish heart function. It can also increase the risk of stroke, congestive heart failure and other heart disease. Approximately 50,000 ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation are performed annually in patients who do not respond to medical therapy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "New 3-D Real-time Heart 'Mapping' Technology Improves Precision And Patient Safety." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071208172537.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2007, December 13). New 3-D Real-time Heart 'Mapping' Technology Improves Precision And Patient Safety. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071208172537.htm
Loyola University Health System. "New 3-D Real-time Heart 'Mapping' Technology Improves Precision And Patient Safety." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071208172537.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins