Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Non-Cancer Deaths More Common Among Breast Cancer Survivors

Date:
February 15, 2008
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Breast cancer survivors, particularly older women, are at greater risk of death from non-cancer causes than from breast cancer. As breast cancer treatments improve, patients are surviving longer, and many are dying of causes unrelated to breast cancer.

Breast cancer survivors, particularly older women, are at greater risk of death from non-cancer causes than from breast cancer.

As breast cancer treatments improve, patients are surviving longer, and many are dying of causes unrelated to breast cancer. Judith-Anne Chapman, Ph.D., and colleagues with the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group investigated whether certain factors, such as pre-existing diseases, are associated with the risk of death from breast cancer, other cancers, or causes other than cancer. For about four years, the researchers followed over 5,000 women enrolled in a breast cancer trial.

During the follow-up, 256 participants died. Non-breast cancer deaths were more common than deaths from breast cancer, and older women, in particular, were more likely to die of other causes. While 60 percent of women in the trial died of causes not related to breast cancer, this figure jumped to 72 percent among women 70 years and older. Two factors were associated with cause of death. Women with pre-existing heart disease were more likely to die of non-cancer causes, and women with pre-existing osteoporosis were at greater risk of dying from cancers other than breast cancer. Women were more likely to die from breast cancer if cancer cells had spread to the lymph nodes.

"Routine use of screening mammography and improved therapeutic management of breast cancer...will mean that more women will survive breast cancer to older ages, at which they might have a higher risk of death from causes other than breast cancer," the authors write.

In an accompanying editorial, Sharon Giordano, M.D., and Gabriel Hortobagyi, M.D., of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston discuss the need for oncologists to consider a patient's pre-existing health problems when determining treatment options.

For example, "cardiovascular disease is of particular concern to breast cancer patients because of its prevalence and the reality that many therapies for breast cancer can cause cardiac dysfunction," the editorialists write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Non-Cancer Deaths More Common Among Breast Cancer Survivors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165429.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2008, February 15). Non-Cancer Deaths More Common Among Breast Cancer Survivors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165429.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Non-Cancer Deaths More Common Among Breast Cancer Survivors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165429.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins