Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Early Blood Pressure Reduction May Improve Stroke Outcomes, Study Suggests

Date:
February 26, 2008
Source:
George Institute for International Health
Summary:
Early and intensive lowering of high blood pressure has shown promising effects in stroke patients, according to results of a new stroke study. Initial results of the first large-scale investigation into managing raised blood pressure after intracerebral haemorrhage (stroke) demonstrates that rapid blood pressure lowering is well tolerated and appears to reduce the amount of bleeding in the brain, indicating that such treatment could reduce the risk of death and disability in stroke patients.

Early and intensive lowering of high blood pressure has shown promising effects in stroke patients, according to results of a new stroke study by The George Institute for International Health.

Related Articles


Initial results of the first large-scale investigation into managing raised blood pressure after intracerebral haemorrhage (stroke) demonstrates that rapid blood pressure lowering is well tolerated and appears to reduce the amount of bleeding in the brain, indicating that such treatment could reduce the risk of death and disability in stroke patients.

"These results show that drug treatment to lower elevated blood pressure can be given quickly and safely to patients with intracranial haemorrhage," said Professor Craig Anderson from The George Institute, who outlined results today at the American Heart Association's International Stroke Conference in New Orleans. "Furthermore, this treatment appears to limit bleeding in the brain in this type of stroke, which may improve chances of recovery for patients."

Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most serious type of stroke that results from rupture of a blood vessel within the brain. This is often the result of high blood pressure and affects over one million people around the world each year. Over one third of patients die early after the onset of ICH and most survivors are left permanently disabled. The aims of the vanguard, or pilot study, were to determine the feasibility and safety of rapid lowering of elevated blood pressure to more 'normal' levels after the onset of ICH, and also test whether the treatment reduces the amount of bleeding in the brain.

The results challenge current international guidelines for the management of blood pressure in stroke, which tend to indicate that high blood pressure is dangerous but are uncertain about either the level at which to commence or cease such treatment. Professor Anderson explained that currently there is wide variation in the use of blood pressure lowering as acute treatment for stroke around the world.

The INTERACT (The INTEnsive blood pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral haemorrhage Trial) vanguard phase recruited 404 patients from 44 hospitals in Australia, China and South Korea from November 2005 to April 2007. Patients who presented within six hours of onset of ICH and with acutely elevated blood pressure or 'hypertension', were randomised to receive either a treatment strategy of rapid blood pressure lowering or the more conservative, American Heart Association guideline-based blood pressure lowering. Patients were followed-up to assess their response to treatment, degree of recovery and changes in brain scans.

"Despite the magnitude of the burden imposed by this disease, and the high cost to health services, there is no widely available treatment for the condition. However, early rapid blood pressure lowering shows considerable promise as a widely applicable, cost-effective therapy that can be readily incorporated into clinical practice," noted Professor Anderson.

Professor Anderson said that this hypothesis will be tested in a much larger, main phase to INTERACT in some 2,000 patients with ICH, commence later this year. The study is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by George Institute for International Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

George Institute for International Health. "Early Blood Pressure Reduction May Improve Stroke Outcomes, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080225101129.htm>.
George Institute for International Health. (2008, February 26). Early Blood Pressure Reduction May Improve Stroke Outcomes, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080225101129.htm
George Institute for International Health. "Early Blood Pressure Reduction May Improve Stroke Outcomes, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080225101129.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

AP (Nov. 21, 2014) Marine Corps officials say a special operations officer left paralyzed by a sniper's bullet in Afghanistan walked using robotic leg braces in a ceremony to award him a Bronze Star. (Nov. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins