Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Federal Toxics Disclosure Law Could Help Inform Public Of Nanotechnology Risks

Date:
February 26, 2008
Source:
Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies
Summary:
The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies is releasing a first-time legal analysis that finds a key federal toxics reporting statute could be applied to production and commercialization of nanotechnology, providing the public with more information about these revolutionary -- yet still potentially risky -- technologies.

The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) has released a first-time legal analysis that finds a key federal toxics reporting statute could be applied to production and commercialization of nanotechnology, providing the public with more information about these revolutionary – yet still potentially risky – technologies.

Related Articles


But before the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) authorities can be applied to nanomaterials, in most cases more toxicological data must be developed to better understand the potential human health and environmental impacts of these cutting-edge technologies. The analysis, conducted by two noted environmental law experts, finds that federal authorities may need to be amended to address reporting thresholds that may not apply effectively to nanomaterials because of their unique characteristics.

“There needs to be development of additional toxicological data on nanomaterials, but in theory TRI could be applied to nanomaterials. The key question is whether EPA will make any determinations about whether particular nanomaterials constitute toxic chemicals,” says Linda Breggin, one the authors of the analysis and Senior Attorney at the Environmental Law Institute.

The landmark analysis comes as over 40 environmental, consumer, labor and other groups are calling for regulation and disclosure of products containing nanomaterials, and as congressional lawmakers are considering legislation to expand reporting requirements for environmental pollutants under TRI. Although currently proposed legislation does not specifically address nanomaterials, a public dialogue about the benefits and costs of TRI is underway that could include discussion of the program’s application to nanomaterials, the new PEN analysis says.

At the local level, in 2006 the City of Berkeley, Calif., adopted a disclosure ordinance that requires nanomaterial manufacturers to disclose the known risks of their products. Now Cambridge, Mass., is considering a similar ordinance, and other local governments may follow suit.

“If Cambridge passes an ordinance similar to Berkeley’s, who knows how many other cities or other municipalities will follow?” says PEN Director David Rejeski. “Soon we could have a patchwork of cities across the country with nanotech disclosure ordinances, which is why environmental law experts should take the time now to make the decision as to whether TRI is a tool that can be used at the federal level to disclose nanomaterials’ potential risks.”

The report also emphasizes the importance of recognizing that several additional right-to-know or disclosure-related laws and initiatives should be explored as possible disclosure vehicles for environmental, health, and safety risks that could be associated with nanomaterials. The report also highlights the fact that additional research is required to determine whether application of TRI to nanomaterials should be pursued as a policy priority in the near term.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. "Federal Toxics Disclosure Law Could Help Inform Public Of Nanotechnology Risks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080226102610.htm>.
Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. (2008, February 26). Federal Toxics Disclosure Law Could Help Inform Public Of Nanotechnology Risks. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080226102610.htm
Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. "Federal Toxics Disclosure Law Could Help Inform Public Of Nanotechnology Risks." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080226102610.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, February 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) Zipping around at 800-miles an hour is coming closer to reality in California. An entire town is being built around Elon Musk&apos;s Hyperloop concept and it wants you to stop in for a ride when it&apos;s ready. Brett Larson is on board. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 26, 2015) Dutch scientists have developed a smart bicycle that uses sensors, wireless technology and video to warn riders of traffic dangers. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Robot dogs are the perfect pet for some in Japan who go to repairmen-turned-vets when their pooch breaks down - while a full Buddhist funeral ceremony awaits those who don&apos;t make it. Duration: 02:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins