Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Quasicrystal Mystery Unraveled With Computer Simulation

Date:
March 11, 2008
Source:
University of Michigan
Summary:
The method to the madness of quasicrystals has been a mystery to scientists. Quasicrystals are solids whose atoms aren't arranged in a repeating pattern, as they are in ordinary crystals. Yet they form intricate patterns that are technologically useful.

Time evolution of growing quasicrystal nucleus (yellow atoms) within a simulated supercooled liquid. Red atoms indicate icosahedral local ordering.
Credit: Aaron Keys, Chris Iacovella and Sharon Glotzer

The method to the madness of quasicrystals has been a mystery to scientists. Quasicrystals are solids whose atoms aren't arranged in a repeating pattern, as they are in ordinary crystals. Yet they form intricate patterns that are technologically useful.

A computer simulation performed by University of Michigan scientists has given new insights into how this unique class of solids forms. Quasicrystals incorporate clusters of atoms as they are, without rearranging them as regular crystals do, said Sharon Glotzer, a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Crystals form when liquids freeze into solids. When a normal crystal grows, a crystallite nucleus develops first. The atoms in the liquid attach one-by-one to the crystallite, as though following a template. If the atoms have already formed a cluster on their own, they must rearrange in order to fit the template. This is how a repeating pattern forms.

In the case of quasicrystals, though, atoms that have already formed stable shapes away from the crystallite can still bind to it. They don't have to make adjustments.

"In our simulations of quasicrystals, we observed that the atoms attach to the crystallite in large groups," said chemical engineering doctoral student Aaron Keys. "These groups have already formed locally stable arrangements, and the growing quasicrystal assimilates them with minimal rearrangement."

Because quasicrystals aren't as regimented as regular crystals, the solid can reach a "structural compromise," where liquid-like molecular arrangements are retained in the solid state. This allows quasicrystals to form more easily than regular crystals.

Quasicrystals are found in certain metal alloys that tend to resist wear and corrosion, and are used in non-stick coatings, for example. They also have high tensile strength, meaning high forces are required to stretch them to their breaking point.

"Learning how they grow will help us figure out to how engineer quasicrystalline structures from new building blocks, which could lead to a slew of new materials," Glotzer said.

Glotzer and Keys are authors of a paper on the research, "How do quasicrystals grow?," published in Physical Review Letters. Their paper is featured in an article in the current edition of the journal Nature. Glotzer is also a professor in the Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering and the Department of Physics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan. "Quasicrystal Mystery Unraveled With Computer Simulation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306190859.htm>.
University of Michigan. (2008, March 11). Quasicrystal Mystery Unraveled With Computer Simulation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306190859.htm
University of Michigan. "Quasicrystal Mystery Unraveled With Computer Simulation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306190859.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Gulfstream G500, G600 Unveiling

Flying (Oct. 20, 2014) Watch Gulfstream's public launch of the G500 and G600 at their headquarters in Savannah, Ga., along with a surprise unveiling of the G500, which taxied up under its own power. Video provided by Flying
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

What We Know About Microsoft's Rumored Smartwatch

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Microsoft will reportedly release a smartwatch that works across different mobile platforms, has a two-day battery life and tracks heart rate. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins