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A Chemical 'Keypad Lock' For Biomolecular Computers

Date:
March 25, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers are reporting an advance toward a new generation of ultra-powerful computers built from DNA and enzymes, rather than transistors, silicon chips, and plastic. They describe development of a chemical "keypad lock," one of the first chemical-based security systems of its kind.

Researchers in New York are reporting an advance toward a new generation of ultra-powerful computers built from DNA and enzymes, rather than transistors, silicon chips, and plastic. A new report on the development of a key component for these "biomolecular computers" has just been published.

Evgeny Katz and colleagues describe development of a chemical "keypad lock," one of the first chemical-based security systems of its kind. The researchers note that years of effort have gone into developing biomolecular computers, which rely on chemical reactions rather than silicon chips to perform logic functions. Among their uses would be encryption of financial, military, and other confidential information. Only individuals with access to a secret "key" -- a chemical key -- could unlock the file and access the data.

The research by Katz and colleagues solved one part of this technological challenge: The security code. They identified a series of naturally occurring chemical reactions that act as a "keypad lock." In laboratory studies, they demonstrated that by adding the correct series of chemicals, the lock could be opened to access the computer. On the other hand, adding the incorrect chemicals to the system acts as a wrong password and prevents access to the computer, they say.

"In addition to the biomolecular security applications, the enzyme-based implication logic networks will be extremely important for making autonomous decisions on the use of specific tools/drugs in various implantable medical systems."

Journal reference: The article "Biocomputing Security System: Concatenated Enzyme-Based Logic Gates Operating as a Biomolecular Keypad Lock" is scheduled for the March 26 issue of ACS' Journal of the American Chemical Society. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja7114713)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "A Chemical 'Keypad Lock' For Biomolecular Computers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080324102640.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, March 25). A Chemical 'Keypad Lock' For Biomolecular Computers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080324102640.htm
American Chemical Society. "A Chemical 'Keypad Lock' For Biomolecular Computers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080324102640.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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