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Treating SSRI-resistant Depression

Date:
March 27, 2008
Source:
Elsevier
Summary:
When your antidepressant medication does not work, should you switch to a different medication from the same class or should you try an antidepressant medication that has a different mechanism of action? This is the question asked in a new article in Biological Psychiatry.

When your antidepressant medication does not work, should you switch to a different medication from the same class or should you try an antidepressant medication that has a different mechanism of action? This is the question asked by researchers in a new article.

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Papakostas and colleagues compared two strategies for treating symptoms of major depressive disorder that do not respond to treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant: either switching to a second SSRI or to a non-SSRI antidepressant. Some common SSRI antidepressants are fluoxetine (Prozac), citalopram (Celexa) and sertraline (Zoloft), while examples of a few common non-SSRI antidepressants are venlafaxine (Effexor) and buproprion (Wellbutrin, Zyban). The authors combined 4 studies comparing these two types of treatment strategies and performed a meta-analysis on the pooled data.

Dr. George I. Papakostas, corresponding author on this project, explains the results: “Switching from a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor to a drug with a different mechanism of action was found to be slightly more effective and slightly less-well tolerated than switching to a non-SSRI drug.” Looking at the findings from a clinical perspective, the advantage in effectiveness means that 22 depressed people would need to be switched to treatment with a non-SSRI for one additional person to obtain relief from their symptoms.

John H. Krystal, M.D., Editor of Biological Psychiatry and affiliated with both Yale University School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, adds that this result “may be related to the fact that while somewhat different, the medications evaluated in this report all acted on the monoamine systems of the brain.” Because of the particular design of this study, the authors explain that “subsequent studies examining whether differences in efficacy between these two treatments exist for specific subpopulations, symptoms, or symptom clusters are warranted.” Dr. Krystal concludes that while this advantage could be important, “there continues to be a pressing need to introduce new antidepressant medications that target novel brain mechanisms.”

The article is “Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression: A Meta-Analysis Comparing Within- Versus Across-Class Switches” by George I. Papakostas, Maurizio Fava and Michael E. Thase. Drs. Papakostas and Fava are affiliated with the Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Thase is affiliated with both the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 63, Issue 7 (April 1, 2008), published by Elsevier.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Elsevier. "Treating SSRI-resistant Depression." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325111747.htm>.
Elsevier. (2008, March 27). Treating SSRI-resistant Depression. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325111747.htm
Elsevier. "Treating SSRI-resistant Depression." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080325111747.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

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