Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nanoelectronics: Compression Of Light Directly Observed By Scientists

Date:
April 1, 2008
Source:
Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique
Summary:
Researchers have observed, through a microscope, plasmons on the surface of conductors measuring 30 nanometers. The use of such plasmons, signals that are at the limit of electronics and optics, is becoming, on this scale, an important issue for the much sought-after miniaturization of electronic circuits.

PEEM observation of the excitation of the plasmon mode of a 100 mm long rod by light at 807 nm.
Credit: CNRS

A team of researchers from CEA(1) and the Université de Technologie de Troyes associated with CNRS(2) has observed, through a microscope, plasmons on the surface of conductors measuring 30 nanometers. The use of such plasmons, signals that are at the limit of electronics and optics, is becoming, on this scale, an important issue for the much sought-after miniaturization of electronic circuits.

This is the first time that images of such high resolution have been obtained for these phenomena, which have been studied for the last ten or so years. This observation is the subject of an article published in Nano Letters  on 12 March 2008.

In electronics, there is continuing technological effort to produce smaller and smaller circuits capable of processing information at higher and higher frequencies. Although electronic devices are becoming both more compact and more complex (computer micro-processors), they are still limited to the usual frequencies of about a gigahertz. Optical frequencies are one million times higher (1015 Hz), but the spatial limits imposed by the wavelength of light (around one micron) prevent further miniaturization.

To reduce the wavelength further and, as it were, compress light, one solution consists in converting the light signal into a plasmon. The plasmon is a phenomenon that has all the characteristics of a light wave, except that it remains confined within the walls of a metal conductor. When the diameter of the metal object is reduced to 30 nm, the plasmon develops a mode known as “slow” (referred to as slow plasmon mode). However, this slow mode has the property of oscillating at the frequency of the light wave while possessing a wavelength well below that of light.

Researchers are interested in this slow plasmon mode because it is on this same scale, approaching 30 nm, that the limits of miniaturization in electronics will soon be set.

Although the principles were already known, they had not yet been experimentally observed. When a plasmon excited by light propagates along a conductor, different secondary effects appear, including the emission of electrons. The researchers therefore used a PEEM (Photo Emission Electron Microscopy) microscope to obtain these images.

The first figure shows the emission from a gold wire. The intensity modulations result from the interference between the slow plasmon and the excitation light wave.

The very high resolution image shows a slow plasmon excitation mode of a 100 nm long “rod” by light with a wavelength of 807 nm. The wavelength compared to the wavelength of light (between 250 and 300 nm) may here be compressed threefold.

By converting the information from an optical signal to a slow plasmon, it is therefore possible to envisage, for structures close to 30 nm, reconciling high optical frequencies with the “classical” dimensions of silicon electronics.

Notes :

  1. CEA-Iramis : Institut rayonnement matière Saclay.
  2. CNRS – Institut Charles Delaunay.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique. "Nanoelectronics: Compression Of Light Directly Observed By Scientists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080330212029.htm>.
Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique. (2008, April 1). Nanoelectronics: Compression Of Light Directly Observed By Scientists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080330212029.htm
Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique. "Nanoelectronics: Compression Of Light Directly Observed By Scientists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080330212029.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) — Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) — 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — Commercial aircraft deliveries rose seven percent at Boeing, prompting the aerospace company to boost full-year profit guidance- though quarterly revenues missed analyst estimates. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — Daimler kicks off a round of second-quarter earnings results from Europe's top carmakers with a healthy set of numbers - prompting hopes that stronger sales in Europe will counter weakness in emerging markets. Hayley Platt reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins