Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Community-acquired MRSA Is Spreading

Date:
April 3, 2008
Source:
Society for General Microbiology
Summary:
Drug resistant hospital superbugs like MRSA have been kept under control in Denmark for more than 30 years. But the latest reports say that in the last 10 years MRSA cases have risen 10 times as new strains of bacteria with resistance genes spread through the community.

Drug resistant hospital superbugs like MRSA have been kept under control in Denmark for more than 30 years. But the latest reports say that in the last 10 years MRSA cases have risen 10 times as new strains of bacteria with resistance genes spread through the community, scientists heard April 1 2008 at the Society for General Microbiology's 162nd meeting.

"The new threat is MRSA transmission in the community, without infected people visiting a hospital or care home themselves, where they might be expected to risk contact with drug resistant bacteria", says Professor Robert Skov from the Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark.

"The spread of community acquired MRSA among the general population creates a huge problem for us", says Professor Skov. "Some infected people will inevitably be hospitalised themselves, or visit friends and relatives who are patients in hospitals. Or they could be health care workers and so will increase the risk of outbreaks of these new types of MRSA. These community strains have evolved independently of the hospital strains and so present a whole new series of problems for control and treatment".

Staphylococcus aureus is common and usually harmless, it is carried by 25-40% of the population on their skin and in their noses. But if it gets inside the body through an injury, cut, surgical operation or through a catheter it can cause infections. These infections are often mild, causing boils or pimples, but in some cases they may develop into more serious infections affecting the bloodstream, joints and bones.

These serious infections were first brought under control with the discovery of penicillin, but as resistance to antibiotics has spread, new and dangerous superbug strains such as MRSA have emerged. These are far more difficult to treat and can cause life-threatening infections, especially in patients with impaired immune systems or low white blood cell counts.

"We have managed to hold the frequency of MRSA cases down to under one per cent in Denmark for over 30 years. But in 1997 we recognised the first cases of community acquired MRSA, a new strain independent of hospital and nursing home contacts, in a young adult and two families in a rural town", says Professor Skov. "From the families we traced the superbug being transmitted through a kindergarten, a school, a factory and a farm. Between 1999 and 2006 the number of community acquired MRSA infections increased from 11 to 175 a year, making up more than 22% of all MRSA infections, as a rising proportion."

The Danish scientists found that the most common method of superbug transmission was from one family member to another, with children and younger adults most affected. And many of the infected families had relations in other countries with a high incidence of MRSA in the population.

The Danish health system responded by introducing new national guidelines in November 2006 designed to prevent MRSA spreading, including increased barrier precautions and isolation nursing in both hospitals and nursing homes. The guidelines appear to be successful, as a small decrease in cases has been observed. The results of these experiences, which have helped to stop the rising epidemic of MRSA, will be published in health journals shortly.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for General Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for General Microbiology. "Community-acquired MRSA Is Spreading." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223808.htm>.
Society for General Microbiology. (2008, April 3). Community-acquired MRSA Is Spreading. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223808.htm
Society for General Microbiology. "Community-acquired MRSA Is Spreading." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080331223808.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins