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Child Sleep Problems Linked To Later Behavioral Difficulties, Study Shows

Date:
April 10, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Children who sleep less may be more likely to report symptoms of anxiety, depression and aggression later in life, according to a new report.

Children who sleep less may be more likely to report symptoms of anxiety, depression and aggression later in life, according to a new report.

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"Sleep problems are risk indicators of later emotional difficulties in childhood and adolescence and in adulthood," according to background information in the article. "For knowledge concerning links between sleep problems and later emotional and behavioral difficulties to be maximally beneficial to the physician, clarification of which particular sleep problems are associated with later difficulties is paramount."

Alice M. Gregory, Ph.D., of the University of London, and colleagues collected sleep data on 2,076 children who were ages 4 to 16 at the beginning of the study. Parents rated their children's sleep and behaviors on various scales and children later reported their own emotional and behavioral symptoms at ages 18 to 32.

Children having parental reports of sleeping less than others had high scores on scales measuring anxiety, depression and aggressive behavior. "There was some (albeit less robust) support for links between other reported sleep difficulties [such as overtiredness and trouble sleeping] and later problems," the authors note. "Parental reports of sleeping more than others and nightmares were not associated with later difficulties."

"The results suggest that children reported to sleep for short periods may be at risk for later difficulties," the authors conclude. "Physicians should inquire about sleep problems during child development and should be aware that some, but perhaps not others, may constitute risk indicators of later difficulties."

Journal reference: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162[4]:330-335. Dr. Gregory was supported by a grant from the University of London Central Research Fund.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Child Sleep Problems Linked To Later Behavioral Difficulties, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080407160745.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, April 10). Child Sleep Problems Linked To Later Behavioral Difficulties, Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080407160745.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Child Sleep Problems Linked To Later Behavioral Difficulties, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080407160745.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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