Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Traffic Woes? New Method Allows Traffic Optimization Over Large Geographic Areas

Date:
May 14, 2008
Source:
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Summary:
How can traffic be monitored and controlled more effectively? Scientists have now developed methods of determining the traffic situation across a wide area, and have refined processes that enable traffic to be optimally channeled. Traffic jams on the way to work, to the shops or to a holiday destination -- a common experience for most of us.

How can traffic be monitored and controlled more effectively? In the ORINOKO project, scientists have developed methods of determining the traffic situation across a wide area, and have refined processes that enable traffic to be optimally channeled.

Traffic jams on the way to work, to the shops or to a holiday destination – a common experience for most of us. Traffic management systems can provide help. Various concepts and measures are being tested, for example in the transport research project ORINOKO (Operative Regional Integrated and Optimized Corridor Control). The project received funding to the tune of almost three million euros from the German federal ministry of economics and technology BMWi over a period of about three years.

The Fraunhofer Institute for Transportation and Infrastructure Systems IVI in Dresden was among the project partners. The IVI team led by Ulf Jung and Georg Fφrster performed a variety of tasks. “One thing we did was set up a central database containing a digital map of the road network. A vast amount of relevant measurement data flows continuously into this database,” says Georg Fφrster. “We also provided software interfaces that enable dynamic data from a variety of sources, such as journey times, traffic volume or tailback lengths, to be used for control and information purposes within the scope of the traffic management system.”

The team is particularly proud at having established a sensor system based on video cameras, which was installed and tested on a trial basis at ten different sites in Nuremberg over the past few months. It can automatically determine certain traffic statistics such as the number of vehicles on the roads or the length of a tailback. These values are continuously fed into a central computer system where they are processed and used to control the traffic. For instance, traffic lights are switched to suit the situation observed by the cameras. “This combination of advanced computer technology and the image processing software developed by us delivers data of a similar quality to those of conventional induction loops, but is much cheaper and more flexible to use,” says IVI head of department Ulf Jung.

The video detector can determine the number of vehicles, their speed, the length of a tailback, and other factors. At present, it is able to analyze up to six traffic lanes simultaneously. The recorded images are processed and interpreted in real time on the spot by a small computer connected to the camera module, which then sends the traffic data and live images to a control center. The new system fills the gap between the established but expensive induction loops and the journey time measurements obtained using sensors in taxis. The video detectors are not only cost-efficient but also deliver a continuous stream of reliable data.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Traffic Woes? New Method Allows Traffic Optimization Over Large Geographic Areas." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080513101610.htm>.
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. (2008, May 14). Traffic Woes? New Method Allows Traffic Optimization Over Large Geographic Areas. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080513101610.htm
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Traffic Woes? New Method Allows Traffic Optimization Over Large Geographic Areas." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080513101610.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) — The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) — The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) — President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) — Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins