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Nutritional Supplement Could Improve Clinical Situation Of ICU Patients

Date:
June 5, 2008
Source:
University of Granada
Summary:
For the first time, it has been determined the exact quantity of vitamins A, E and C and minerals needed to improve the clinic situation of critical patients. This study suggests that the oxide stress increase during patients stays in the Intensive Care Unit is due to the low levels of antioxidant food consumption.

UGR News Scientists from the University of Granada and the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital have found out that some critical patients could improve their oxide stress and, consequently, their clinical situation by taking a simple exogenous antioxidant treatment through food. This study suggests that the oxide stress increase during patients stays in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is due to the low levels of antioxidant food consumption.

The oxide stress is caused by the imbalance between the reactive oxygen substances production and the organism defence mechanisms which acts rapidly in the detoxification of these substances or repairs the damage. The oxide stress is involved in many diseases like atherosclerosis, Parkinson, Alzheimer, and it is also significant in the aging process.

This study made by the University of Granada has been carried out by Jimena Abilιs, and headed by doctor Elena Planells (Departament of Physiology of the University of Granada), doctor Antonio Pιrez de la Cruz (head of the Nutrition and Dietetics Unit of the Ruiz de Alda Hospital in Granada) and doctor Eduardo Aguayo (specialist in the Intensive Cure Unit of this same hospital).

The scientists worked on 60 patients that, for at least a week, had stayed at the Intensive Cure Unit (ICU) of the Virgen de las Nieves Hospital, analyzing their oxide stress levels. They determined, for the first time in Spain, the exact quantity of each type of vitamins (A, E and C) and minerals that patients needed to take through diet for proper antioxidant defences.

The researchers hope the study will be useful to establish new recommendations for critical patients in Spain. The results of this investigation have been recently published in the medical journal Critical Care.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Granada. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Granada. "Nutritional Supplement Could Improve Clinical Situation Of ICU Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080604101536.htm>.
University of Granada. (2008, June 5). Nutritional Supplement Could Improve Clinical Situation Of ICU Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080604101536.htm
University of Granada. "Nutritional Supplement Could Improve Clinical Situation Of ICU Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080604101536.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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