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Decreased Total Sleep Time Associated With Increased REM Sleep During Subsequent Naps

Date:
June 10, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
Decreased nightly total sleep time, even within the normal range, is associated with an increased percentage of REM sleep during subsequent naps.

Decreased nightly total sleep time, even within the normal range, is associated with an increased percentage of REM sleep during subsequent naps, according to a research abstract that will be presented on June 10 at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS).

The study, authored by Jennifer Kanady, of the University of California at San Diego, focused on 24 healthy subjects, who wore an actigraph for seven nights while adhering to a regular sleep-wake schedule followed by a 90-minute, polysomnographically-recorded nap. The influence of two-night and seven-night averages of total sleep time immediately prior to the nap on nap architecture was examined.

According to the results, less prior nightly total sleep time increased the percentage of REM sleep during the nap. Average total sleep time did not affect any other architecture variable of the nap. Bed and wake time appear to influence REM sleep percentage only in the short-term.

"The findings of our study indicate that minute differences in 'normal' sleep duration influence the percentage of REM sleep obtained in a subsequent afternoon nap," said Kanady. "Specifically, 10 minutes less sleep per night led to a 1.3 percent increase in nap REM percentage. These results may have important implications for studies examining sleep-dependent memory consolidation, particularly those studies that highlight the importance of REM sleep."

It is recommended that adults get between seven and eight hours of nightly sleep.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Decreased Total Sleep Time Associated With Increased REM Sleep During Subsequent Naps." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080610071936.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2008, June 10). Decreased Total Sleep Time Associated With Increased REM Sleep During Subsequent Naps. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080610071936.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Decreased Total Sleep Time Associated With Increased REM Sleep During Subsequent Naps." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080610071936.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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