Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lupus More Severe In Patients With Southern European Ancestry

Date:
June 11, 2008
Source:
European League Against Rheumatism
Summary:
Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with a higher percentage of ancestry from southern Europe have more severe disease manifestations, according to new research.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with a higher percentage of ancestry from southern Europe have more severe disease manifestations, according to new research presented today at EULAR 2008, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Paris, France.

Related Articles


According to the results of the research, northern European ancestry is shown to be associated with the relatively milder mucocutaneous (skin) manifestations of SLE, whereas southern European ancestry contributes to more severe manifestations of the disorder such as nephritis (inflammation of the kidneys) and increased production of specific autoantibodies (antibodies that fail to recognise and therefore attack the body's own cells, tissues or organs).

SLE is a complex autoimmune disease characterised by chronic inflammation and damage to body tissues, which occurs as a result of the production of abnormal antibodies that target and cause damage to cells of the patient's body, including immune cells. SLE has the potential to affect a variety of areas of the body, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, joints, and/or nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remission. Lupus can occur at any age but is most common in women, particularly of non-European descent. Until now, the relationship between specific European ancestry and SLE severity has not been studied.

Professor Lindsey A Criswell of the University of California, San Francisco, USA, who led the study, said: "Exploring the ancestry and genetic make-up of patients in relation to their disease today helps us to better understand the complex nature of SLE and why it manifests itself differently in different people. This study shows a clear correlation between specific European ancestry and SLE disease severity and autoantibody production, which may further assist in understanding the risk factors for this condition and should help us better understand and manage this disease in the future."

Researchers in this study examined 1,270 SLE patients from four independent cohorts who had at least 90% European ancestry according to continental ancestry-informative genetic markers. 1,409 genome-wide markers informative for northern versus southern European ancestry were then analysed to estimate the percentage of northern European ancestry for each subject using the STRUCTURE programme. The association between northern European ancestry and specific SLE subphenotypes, including autoantibody production, nephritis, arthritis and mucocutaneous manifestations was then explored.

Northern European ancestry was positively associated with photosensitivity (odds ratio=2.0, p<10-6) and discoid rash (odds ratio=1.9, p=0.01), which are relatively mild manifestations of SLE. It was inversely associated with anti-nuclear autoantibodies (odds ratio=0.38, p-value=0.0005), anticardiolipin antibodies (odds ratio=0.66, 95%, p-value =0.02), arthritis (odds ratio=0.62, p-value =0.003), and renal disorder (odds ratio=0.75, p-value =0.04).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European League Against Rheumatism. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European League Against Rheumatism. "Lupus More Severe In Patients With Southern European Ancestry." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611135055.htm>.
European League Against Rheumatism. (2008, June 11). Lupus More Severe In Patients With Southern European Ancestry. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611135055.htm
European League Against Rheumatism. "Lupus More Severe In Patients With Southern European Ancestry." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611135055.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) According to a report from the CDC, suicide rates among young women increased from 1994 to 2012 while rates among young men have decreased. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins