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Nanoencapsulation Of Low Soluable Cancer Drugs

Date:
July 16, 2008
Source:
Louisiana Tech University
Summary:
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a innovative approach to cancer drug nanoencapsulation. The new method allows for adjusting drug release rates and attaching antibodies at the outer shell layers for targeted drug delivery.
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Dr. Yuri Lvov (left), professor of chemistry and micro and nanosystems, assists student Rohit Ghan with his work.
Credit: Image courtesy of Louisiana Tech University

Dr. Yuri Lvov, a professor of chemistry and T. Pipes endowed chair in micro and nanosystems at Louisiana Tech University, and Anshul Agarwal, a Louisiana Tech doctoral candidate in biomedical engineering have developed cancer drug nanoencapsulation.

Working from Louisiana Tech's Institute for Micromanufacturing, Lvov and Agarwal collaborated with pharmaceutical researchers from Northeastern University in Boston on a new article in Pharma Focus Asia. The article looks at nanoencapsulation of low soluble cancer drugs and presents an innovative approach for adjusting drug release rates and attaching antibodies at the outer shell layers for targeted drug delivery.

"We may be able to drastically increase the efficiency of existing low-soluble cancer drugs by way of their nanoparticle formulation," says Lvov. "We are working with several other institutions around the country that are currently in the process of testing our new drug formulation."

"The application of his approach to nanoassembly into clinical drug delivery will enable further improvements in cancer therapy that may reduce some of the traumatic impact of current methods," states Napper.

But Lvov is quick to point out that he is not alone in this endeavor.

"This is not singular research. Drs. Mark DeCoster, David Mills, Patrick O'Neal and many Ph.D. students at the Institute for Micromanufacturing are diligently working on different parts of our drug nanoencapsulation program."

"Nanoencapsulation research is of significant interest to pharmaceutical companies," said Guice.

"We (Louisiana Tech) are not making a new drug," explains Lvov. "But just as important, we are the engineers working in nanotechnology to make new, more efficient formulations for existing drugs."


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Louisiana Tech University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Sonication-Assisted Nanoencapsulation. Pharma Focus Asia, July 2008

Cite This Page:

Louisiana Tech University. "Nanoencapsulation Of Low Soluable Cancer Drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080711165837.htm>.
Louisiana Tech University. (2008, July 16). Nanoencapsulation Of Low Soluable Cancer Drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080711165837.htm
Louisiana Tech University. "Nanoencapsulation Of Low Soluable Cancer Drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080711165837.htm (accessed August 30, 2015).

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