Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Increased Risk For Disabilities After Preterm Birth

Date:
July 22, 2008
Source:
University of Bergen
Summary:
Premature birth is associated with various life-long problems. Still, many premature children seem to function very well as adults according to a new large and comprehensive study from Norway.

Premature birth is associated with various life-long problems. Still, many premature children seem to function very well as adults according to a new large and comprehensive study from Norway.

Recent advances in perinatal care have increased the survival rates of premature babies. Follow-up studies to school age have shown an increase in learning difficulties, and behavioral and psychological problems. Knowledge on how these children manage a competitive adult society is, however, sparse.

A Norwegian study has followed 903 402 infants born between 1967 and 1983 till adulthood. The study included children with a gestational age of 23 weeks or more who were born without birth defects. Information on subsequent medical disabilities and social conditions were provided from several national registries.

The study demonstrated a strong association between preterm birth and medical disabilities like cerebral palsy, mental retardation and several other disorders. There was also strong association with likelihood of receiving disability pension.

“For those without medical disabilities, there was a weaker, but still significant association between preterm birth and level of education, income, need for social security benefits, the likelihood of establishing a family and having own children. There was, however, no association with unemployment or criminality,” says Dag Moster, the leading author of the study and Consultant Neonatal Pediatrician at the Pediatric Department, Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway.

“There was a striking dose response relationship between gestational age at birth and most of the outcome studied, especially for medical disabilities. It is, however, important to emphasize that most premature children who survived without medical disabilities completed higher education, had good jobs and appeared to function well as adults.”

Journal reference: The New England Journal of Medicine, 17 July, Volume 359:262-273


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bergen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Bergen. "Increased Risk For Disabilities After Preterm Birth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080718220007.htm>.
University of Bergen. (2008, July 22). Increased Risk For Disabilities After Preterm Birth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 14, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080718220007.htm
University of Bergen. "Increased Risk For Disabilities After Preterm Birth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080718220007.htm (accessed September 14, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 12, 2014) Hundreds of children in several states have been stricken by a serious respiratory illness that is spreading across the U.S. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 12, 2014) The World Health Organisation warns that local health workers in West Africa can't keep up with Ebola - and among those countries hardest hit by the outbreak, the economic damage is coming into focus, too. As David Pollard reports, Sierra Leone admits that growth in one of the poorest economies in the region is taking a beating. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins