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Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: New Guidelines Developed For Physicians

Date:
August 25, 2008
Source:
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Summary:
Updated rules add new anti-arthritic drugs and proven combinations to the arsenal for treating rheumatoid arthritis. The RA guidelines, issued by the American College of Rheumatology, are the first update since 2002. They focus on several classes of anti-arthritic drugs, including disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and genetically engineered biologics.

Proven combinations of medicines and the introduction of new anti-arthritis drugs have significantly improved the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to guidelines issued by the American College of Rheumatology and co-authored by physicians at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

Lead author Kenneth Saag, M.D., M.Sc., a professor in the UAB Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, said the new guidelines update strategies for treating RA with the goal of preventing joint damage and disability.

The new recommendations do not strive to replace individualized medical decisions, Saag said. Instead, they are meant to guide rheumatologists and other health care workers toward the most updated recommendations. The last set of American College of Rheumatology RA treatment guidelines was published in 2002. “The recommendations developed are not intended to be used in a ‘cookbook’ or prescriptive manner, or to limit a physician’s clinical judgment,” Saag said. “They provide guidance based on clinical evidence and expert panel input.”

Biologics And DMARDs

The recommendations focus on several classes of anti-arthritic drugs, including a potent group of agents called disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Newer genetically engineered DMARDs called biologics often work in combination with earlier therapies. Many anti-arthritic drugs are designed to stop damaging inflammation, and biologics work to interrupt the chain of events that leads to inflammation.

Newer biologics called anti-TNF agents – adalimumab (Humira), etanercept (Enbrel) and infliximab (Remicade)– prevent the production of an immunity protein that plays a role in inflammation.

Some of the key recommendations include:

  • Methotrexate or leflunomide therapy is recommended for most RA patients.
  • Anti-TNF agents etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab along with methotrexate can be used in new or early RA cases with worsening and severe symptoms.
  • Doctors should not initiate or resume treatment with methotrexate, leflunomide, or biologics if RA patients have active bacterial infection, shingles (herpes-zoster), hepatitis B, hepatitis C and active or latent tuberculosis.
  • Doctors should not prescribe anti-TNF agents to patients with a history of heart failure, lymphoma or multiple sclerosis.

The full list of RA treatment recommendations is available at http://www.rheumatology.org/publications/guidelines/index.asp?aud=mem.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: New Guidelines Developed For Physicians." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080722143707.htm>.
University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2008, August 25). Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: New Guidelines Developed For Physicians. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080722143707.htm
University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: New Guidelines Developed For Physicians." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080722143707.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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