Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Internal Medicine Residents May Benefit Most From Time In Clinic

Date:
July 28, 2008
Source:
University of Cincinnati
Summary:
A new approach to internal medicine residency training could improve patient care and physician-patient relationships. Research has shown that residents who spent increased time in outpatient settings as opposed to the hospital delivered a higher quality of care and had more satisfaction in their duties.

Resident Lee Ann Merchen, MD, examines Christopher Duncan. UC researchers found that residents benefit more from time in outpatient settings.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Cincinnati

A new approach to internal medicine residency training could improve patient care and physician-patient relationships, according to a University of Cincinnati study.

Eric Warm, MD, associate professor of medicine and lead investigator of the study, says research showed residents who spent increased time in outpatient settings as opposed to the hospital delivered a higher quality of care and had more satisfaction in their duties.

Results of this study are published in the July edition of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

“We essentially redesigned how the internal medicine residency runs,” says Warm. “With this new system, residents complete one year in an outpatient clinic actually doing the things patients expect from their primary care doctors. In the past, residents were based mainly in the hospital, and their delivery of care to outpatients suffered.”

Warm says in restructuring the program, he and colleagues hoped to reduce conflict between inpatient and outpatient care, provide enough time for hands-on learning and enhance the feeling of reward for residents, in addition to raising patient satisfaction and improving physician continuity.

He says there are two overall problems with current residency programs that are primarily focused on inpatient care: not enough time spent in the clinics and no tool to assess the quality of work in the clinic or ways to make it better.

“By placing our residents in the clinic, it allows them to focus on patient care,” he says. “Within the first year, both the patients’ and the residents’ satisfaction had increased.

“We utilized the chronic care model—a tool that helps improve patient care—as our central operating force.”

Instead of allowing residents to engage in “sporadic” interactions with patients for three years, this new model placed them face-to-face with the same patients for one year. During this time, they developed more intimate relationships with patients and learned how to assess and improve the quality of care they delivered.

Overall, residents reported an improvement in their ability to focus in the clinic without being distracted, an increase in personal reward and a greater sense of relationship with their patients.

Patients were also more satisfied with their care, according to Press-Ganey survey data.

Warm says there are several other legs of this study to be completed in the future, including research on the long-term impact on chronic disease.

“We hope research such as this will lead to the most optimal training for our doctors, which will benefit patients in the future,” he says.

The study is part of the Educational Innovations Project (EIP),sponsored through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, to facilitate competency-based education and outcomes assessment in programs needing innovation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati. "Internal Medicine Residents May Benefit Most From Time In Clinic." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080724150441.htm>.
University of Cincinnati. (2008, July 28). Internal Medicine Residents May Benefit Most From Time In Clinic. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080724150441.htm
University of Cincinnati. "Internal Medicine Residents May Benefit Most From Time In Clinic." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080724150441.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins