Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Study Spotlights National Institutes Of Health Grant Outcomes For Clinical Research

Date:
July 25, 2008
Source:
Medical College of Wisconsin
Summary:
Although the need to translate basic science discoveries into the clinical arena is widely acknowledged, a new study has identified reasons why clinical science grant applications receive less positive peer reviews than basic science grant applications to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Although the need to translate basic science discoveries into the clinical arena is widely acknowledged, a new study by researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin, in Milwaukee, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) identified reasons why clinical science grant applications receive less positive peer reviews than basic science grant applications to the NIH. The findings were published in the July issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Related Articles


In collaboration with Michael R. Martin, Ph.D., and Teresa Lindqusit, MS, at NIH's Center for Scientific Review CSR), Dr. Theodore Kotchen, associate dean for clinical research and professor of medicine at the Medical College, studied 92,922 grant applications submitted to NIH between October 2000 and May 2004. Of that number, 67.5 percent were considered basic science applications and 32.5 percent were considered clinical applications. Dr. Kotchen is special advisor on clinical research to the NIH's CSR.

They found that investigators conducting clinical research were less likely to submit a continuing, competitive renewal grant application than investigators conducting basic research (20.0% vs. 28.3%). However, renewal applications generally receive more favorable reviews than new applications. The study concluded that approximately one-half of the observed differences in peer review outcomes for clinical versus basic research applications can be attributed to the lower rate of resubmission by clinical applicants.

Another reason for differences in review outcomes was related to applicants failing to adequately address human subject concerns in their applications. Human subject concerns, which the NIH defines as any potential or actual unacceptable risk or inadequate protection against risks to human subjects, were identified in 15% of clinical grant applications.

"Applications cited for having human subject concerns do not necessarily mean that the science is less meritorious," says Dr. Kotchen.

"Human subject concerns raised at the time of review may reflect inadequate explanation by the investigator in the protection of human subjects section of the application. Further instructions clarifying how to complete the human subject section of grant applications may be necessary.

"The message to applicants is that failure to provide complete information about plans for protecting human subjects may result in a less favorable priority and could adversely affect the likelihood of funding."

According to Kotchen, "There are continuing national concerns about the robustness of the clinical research enterprise. This includes a shortage of clinical investigators, the attrition of experienced clinical investigators, lack of adequate infrastructure at academic medical centers, and the financial burden faced by promising young scientists."

He points out that, "The clinical research enterprise would benefit from an informed understanding of the factors contributing to the attrition of experienced clinical investigators."

Clinical research grants were defined as any grants that include involvement of human subjects. This definition includes research on mechanisms of disease, therapeutic interventions, clinical trials, development of technologies, epidemiological and behavioral studies outcomes, and health services research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Medical College of Wisconsin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Medical College of Wisconsin. "New Study Spotlights National Institutes Of Health Grant Outcomes For Clinical Research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725122633.htm>.
Medical College of Wisconsin. (2008, July 25). New Study Spotlights National Institutes Of Health Grant Outcomes For Clinical Research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725122633.htm
Medical College of Wisconsin. "New Study Spotlights National Institutes Of Health Grant Outcomes For Clinical Research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080725122633.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins