Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Announce Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation Breakthrough

Date:
July 30, 2008
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Scientists have figured out a simple, cost-effective process to freeze mouse sperm and get it to achieve high fertilization rates with mouse eggs. The breakthrough will greatly reduce the cost of developing and distributing new mouse models of human disease.

A team of Jackson Laboratory scientists have figured out a simple, cost-effective process to freeze mouse sperm and get it to achieve high fertilization rates with mouse eggs. The breakthrough will greatly reduce the cost of developing and distributing new mouse models of human disease.

Freezing sperm is an efficient, cost-effective way to conserve and distribute genetics in the agricultural industry and putting male sex cells on ice is a fundamental part of human fertility programs. But the sperm of certain varieties of mice under-achieve woefully after being frozen and thawed. What's worse: the thawed sperm of the most popular mouse strain in the scientific world, the C57BL/6 or "Black 6", are known to under-perform when it comes to fertilizing mouse eggs.

Drs. Michael Wiles and Chuck Ostermeier in Jackson's Technology Evaluation and Development group, and Dr. Robert Taft and Ms. Jane Farley in the Reproductive Sciences group, have published a paper on the new technique in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, where it can be freely accessed online.

The technology has already attracted interest from international academic and pharmaceutical laboratories.

The Jackson team reports that their technique consistently yields fertilization rates of about 70 percent – a six-fold increase over previous mouse sperm freezing techniques. The results were achieved by collecting the sperm into a cocktail of raffinose (a plant-based sugar complex), skim milk and the antioxidant monothioglycerol. The sperm suspension is loaded into narrow plastic straws about the size of a swizzle stick, and then slowly cooled before storage in liquid nitrogen.

When frozen sperm are needed for fertilization, they are thawed and incubated in in vitro fertilization media for an hour before adding oocyte cumulus masses (clusters of egg cells).

Dr. Wiles noted, "The world research community is making literally thousands of new mouse models," using stem cells to introduce specific genetic variations that mimic the mutations identified in human diseases. "The problem is that it costs about $10,000 a year to maintain a particular mouse strain, and worldwide only a few hundred strains are in actual laboratory experiments at any given time."

Since the 1970s, the Laboratory has addressed this problem by cryopreserving – freezing and storing – mouse embryos from little-used strains, which allows the live mice from those strains to be safely removed from the mouse room. However, freezing embryos is far less efficient and cost-effective than freezing sperm. "If you freeze 250 embryos," Dr. Wiles said, "you can only count on about 125 live pups. But a single male mouse can produce millions of sperm, which can give rise to 100s or even 1,000s of offspring. Thus, making sperm cryopreservation work has long been a goal of ours."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ostermeier GC, Wiles MV, Farley JS, Taft RA. Conserving, Distributing and Managing Genetically Modified Mouse Lines by Sperm Cryopreservation. PLoS ONE, 2008; 3 (7): e2792 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002792

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Scientists Announce Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation Breakthrough." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729234146.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2008, July 30). Scientists Announce Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation Breakthrough. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729234146.htm
Public Library of Science. "Scientists Announce Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation Breakthrough." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080729234146.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) The World Health Organizations says TB numbers rose in 2013, but it's partly due to better detection and more survivors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins