Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High Resolution Heart Images Now Available At Peak Stress

Date:
August 3, 2008
Source:
Ohio State University Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have designed equipment to provide high resolution images of the heart at a critical stage of testing that have previously been difficult to obtain using standard testing procedures. Superior images of the heart are obtained with a test lasting less than one hour.

While treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease, physicians are often challenged to gain clear images of the heart when a patient is at peak stress level.

Related Articles


That is changing at the Ohio State University Medical Center where researchers have designed equipment to provide high resolution images of the heart at a critical stage of testing that have previously been difficult to obtain using standard testing procedures. Superior images of the heart are obtained with a test lasting less than one hour.

“In the past, we were constrained by the time lapse between the completion of exercise and capturing the images,” said Orlando “Lon” Simonetti, PhD, associate professor of internal medicine and radiology. “We now have the ability to exercise patients to peak stress and obtain a high definition image of their heart within 60 seconds, which helps us more accurately identify exercise-induced abnormalities. OSU Medical Center is the only place in the world performing treadmill exercise stress tests inside the MRI scan room.”

The standard design of treadmills has made exercise stress testing a challenge near the large magnetic field generated by the MRI equipment. Simonetti and his team, working with graduate students from Ohio State’s College of Engineering and faculty from the OSU Agricultural Technical Institute, modified a treadmill for use in close proximity to the MRI exam table. Magnetic components were replaced with non-magnetic stainless steel and aluminum equivalents.

While patients perform the treadmill exercise test, they are monitored using a 12-lead electrocardiogram system that is disconnected after exercise. Heart rate and rhythm are then monitored with a wireless, MRI-compatible electrode unit while patients undergo a rapid, real-time imaging procedure that takes less than one minute.

Clinicians are excited about the possibilities. “Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and by combining our medical expertise with other disciplines, we can develop safe approaches for improved diagnosis and treatment,” said Dr. Subha Raman, associate professor of internal medicine in OSU Medical Center’s division of cardiovascular medicine. “While current forms of stress testing have been helpful, combining exercise stress with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging allows us to better measure the presence and extent of heart disease with a clarity not previously possible.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ohio State University Medical Center. "High Resolution Heart Images Now Available At Peak Stress." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080730140843.htm>.
Ohio State University Medical Center. (2008, August 3). High Resolution Heart Images Now Available At Peak Stress. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080730140843.htm
Ohio State University Medical Center. "High Resolution Heart Images Now Available At Peak Stress." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080730140843.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr. Oz Under Fire For 'Quack Treatments' Yet Again

Dr. Oz Under Fire For 'Quack Treatments' Yet Again

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Ten doctors signed a letter urging Columbia University to drop Dr. Oz as vice chair of its department of surgery, saying he plugs "quack" treatments. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins