Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Location, Location, Location Important For Genes, Too

Date:
August 30, 2008
Source:
Ohio State University Medical Center
Summary:
To better understand how cells become cancerous, a new study by cancer researchers looks at four genes that help regulate cell growth in embryos and contribute to cancer in adults. The genes are generally believed to work together to help control cell proliferation. But this study shows that mice need just one of the four genes to develop from fertilized eggs through adulthood.

Cells become cancerous mainly because they lose control of their growth. To better understand how this happens, a new study at Ohio State University's Comprehensive Cancer Center looks at four genes that help regulate cell growth in embryos and that contribute to cancer in adults.

Related Articles


The genes – E2f1, E2f2, and E2f3a and E2f3b – are generally believed to work together to help control cell proliferation, a belief that comes from experiments using only cells. Cancer researchers at The Ohio State University carried out several studies in an animal model to learn if it is also true in the body during development.

The scientists also hoped to learn why many organisms, including humans, have multiple E2F genes of this type, while other animals have just one copy.

Their study, published in the Aug. 28 issue of the journal Nature, shows that mice need just one of the four genes to develop from fertilized eggs through adulthood.

"We found that if E2f3a is present, the animals can develop normally through adulthood, even when all the other genes are absent," says study leader Gustavo Leone, an associate professor of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics at Ohio State's Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Then came the real surprise. To learn if the E2f3a gene was doing something truly critical and different from the other three E2Fs, the scientists swapped it with one of the others – they replaced it first with E2f3 gene, then with the E2f1. Neither change made any difference; these "swapped" mice developed quite normally.

"If the E2F3a gene was doing something unique, replacing it with one of the others should prevent development," Leone says. "But the animals still developed just fine.

"We conclude from this that it is the gene's location in the genome, plus the timing and level of its activity, that makes it so important during development," he says.

But if just one of the genes is sufficient for development, why are the others needed?

"Organisms above insects have multiple E2Fs, and these findings don't tell us what the others are doing," Leone says. "We surmise that the other genes are required for adult survival under the stressful conditions in the wild. We are investigating that now."

Funding from the National Cancer Institute, the Department of Defense, a Pew Charitable Trusts Award and a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar Award supported this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ohio State University Medical Center. "Location, Location, Location Important For Genes, Too." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080829091325.htm>.
Ohio State University Medical Center. (2008, August 30). Location, Location, Location Important For Genes, Too. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080829091325.htm
Ohio State University Medical Center. "Location, Location, Location Important For Genes, Too." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080829091325.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Google X wants to improve modern medicine with nanoparticles and a wearable device. It's all an attempt to tackle disease detection and prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Researchers in Sweden released a study showing heavy milk drinkers face an increased mortality risk from a variety of causes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Surrounded by health care workers in the White House East Room, President Barack Obama said the U.S. will likely see additional Ebola cases in the weeks ahead. But he said the nation can't seal itself off in the fight against the disease. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins