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Almost 7 Million Pregnant In Sub-Saharan Africa Infected With Hookworms

Date:
September 18, 2008
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
A new study reveals that between a quarter and a third of pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa, or almost 7 million, are infected with hookworms and at increased risk of developing anemia.

A study published in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases reveals that between a quarter and a third of pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa, or almost 7 million, are infected with hookworms and at increased risk of developing anaemia.

Hookworms are parasitic worms which live in the intestine and can cause anaemia (lower than normal number of red blood cells in the blood). Their importance in causing anaemia during pregnancy has been poorly understood, and this has hampered effective lobbying for the inclusion of deworming drugs in maternal health care packages.

The study was conducted by Simon Brooker (a Reader at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and a Wellcome Trust Career Development fellow currently based at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Collaborative Programme, Nairobi), together with Peter Hotez (George Washington University and Sabin Vaccine Institute, United States) and Donald Bundy (The World Bank, United States).

By carrying out a systematic search of medical databases, reference lists, and unpublished data, the team was able to compare levels of haemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying part of red blood cells) according to the intensity of hookworm infection among the women studied. They found that increasing intensity of infection was associated with lower levels of haemoglobin. The authors estimate that 37.7 million women of reproductive age and 6.9 million pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa were infected with hookworm in 2005, and were therefore at risk of anaemia.

"Most of the studies we identified showed that hookworm was associated with maternal anaemia," says Brooker, "and that there are clear benefits of deworming for both maternal and child health." He adds, "In many developing countries it is policy that pregnant women receive deworming treatment, but in practice coverage rates are often unacceptably low. Therefore, we encourage that efforts are made to increase coverage of deworming among pregnant women in Africa."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brooker S, Hotez PJ, Bundy DAP. Hookworm-Related Anaemia among Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2008; 2 (9): e291 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000291

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Almost 7 Million Pregnant In Sub-Saharan Africa Infected With Hookworms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080917145411.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2008, September 18). Almost 7 Million Pregnant In Sub-Saharan Africa Infected With Hookworms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080917145411.htm
Public Library of Science. "Almost 7 Million Pregnant In Sub-Saharan Africa Infected With Hookworms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080917145411.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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