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Individuals With Social Phobia See Themselves Differently

Date:
October 7, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Magnetic resonance brain imaging reveals that patients with generalized social phobia respond differently than others to negative comments about themselves, according to a new report.

Magnetic resonance brain imaging reveals that patients with generalized social phobia respond differently than others to negative comments about themselves, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

"Generalized social phobia is characterized by fear/avoidance of social situations and fear of being judged negatively by others," the authors write as background information in the article. "It is the most common anxiety disorder in the general population, with the lifetime prevalence estimated at 13.3 percent, and it is associated with a high risk for depression, alcohol and drug abuse and suicide." Previous studies have found differences in the way brains of affected individuals respond to facial expressions, suggesting that the condition involves increased responsiveness to social stimuli in areas linked to emotion.

Karina Blair, Ph.D., and colleagues at the National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Md., compared functional MRI (fMRI) scans of 17 unmedicated individuals with generalized social phobia to those of 17 controls who were the same age and sex and had the same IQ but did not have the disorder. "During fMRI scans, individuals read positive (e.g., You are beautiful), negative (e.g., You are ugly) and neutral (e.g., You are human) comments that could be either about the self or about somebody else (e.g., He is beautiful)," the authors write.

The patients with generalized social phobia showed increased blood flow in their medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala—areas of the brain linked to concepts of self as well as fear, emotion and stress response—when reading negative statements about themselves. However, there were no differences between the two groups in response to negative comments referring to others or neutral or positive comments referring to either self or others.

"Given that medial prefrontal cortex regions are involved in representations of the self, it might be suggested that these regions, together with the amygdala, play a primary role in the development and maintenance of generalized social phobia and that the pathology in the disorder at least partly reflects a negative attitude toward the self, particularly in response to social stimuli—that in generalized social phobia what engages the mind is others' criticism," the authors conclude. "This highly context-dependent response in generalized social phobia helps constrain existing models of the disorder and may thus guide future therapeutic formulations in the treatment of the disorder."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Blair et al. Neural Response to Self- and Other Referential Praise and Criticism in Generalized Social Phobia. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 2008; 65 (10): 1176-1184 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Individuals With Social Phobia See Themselves Differently." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006180656.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, October 7). Individuals With Social Phobia See Themselves Differently. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006180656.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Individuals With Social Phobia See Themselves Differently." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081006180656.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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