Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Consumers And Plastic Surgeons Say Economy Is Cutting Into Cosmetic Procedures

Date:
October 29, 2008
Source:
American Society of Plastic Surgeons
Summary:
While history has taught us that looks matter for everyone from presidential candidates to the person next door, the economic crisis is forcing many consumers to re-evaluate their cosmetic surgery plans. It is very clear the economy is affecting the demand for surgical cosmetic procedures, according to the researchers.

 While history has taught us that looks matter for everyone from presidential candidates to the person next door, the economic crisis is forcing many consumers to re-evaluate their cosmetic surgery plans. The results of consumer and plastic surgeon polls are being release in conjunction with Plastic Surgery 2008, the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) at McCormick Place in Chicago October 31st through November 5th.

"It appears more consumers are choosing the less invasive cosmetic procedures, both to give them a boost or to buy time if they need to postpone a more costly invasive surgical procedure because of the economic downturn," says, Richard D'Amico, MD, ASPS president. "We have taken the economic pulse of potential patients and ASPS Member Surgeons, and the results are in."

In March, and then again in October, ASPS conducted identical economic surveys with women considering cosmetic plastic surgery within the next two years.

  • 59 percent of respondents say the economy has had an impact on their plans for cosmetic plastic surgery. That's up 9 percent from six months ago.
  • 48 percent of the survey participants are less likely to schedule a consultation appointment now compared to 30 percent six months ago.
  • 27 percent of the survey participants indicated they were considering less expensive options, compared with 20 percent six months ago.

ASPS Member Surgeons were polled and asked to compare the first six months of 2008 during the economic slowdown to the first six months of 2007. The following percentage of physicians who perform the procedures report:

Overall cosmetic procedures

  • 62 percent report a decrease
  • Region most affected – Northeast and Southeast
  • Region least affected - Midwest

Surgical cosmetic procedures

  • 62 percent report a decrease in breast augmentation
  • Region most affected – Southeast
  • Region least affected - West
  • 64 percent report a decrease in liposuction
  • Region most affected – Northeast
  • Region least affected - Midwest
  • 49 percent report a decrease eye-lid surgery
  • Region most affected – Northeast
  • Region least affected - Midwest
  • 44 percent report a decrease in nose reshaping
  • Region most affected – Southeast
  • Region least affected - Midwest 

Minimally invasive cosmetic procedures

  • 73 percent (almost 3 out of 4) report an increased or stable demand for procedures like Botox®, chemical peels, and hyaluronic fillers.
  • Largest increase - Northeast
  • Smallest increase - West

"It is very clear the economy is affecting the demand for surgical cosmetic procedures. We are hearing that from consumers and plastic surgeons," Dr. D'Amico says.

Methodology: The results of the consumer survey are based on a 25 percent response rate of 400 people questioned. The results of the ASPS Member Surgeon survey are based on an 18 percent response rate of 2093 surgeons questioned. The margin of error is plus or minus 4.8 percent.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Consumers And Plastic Surgeons Say Economy Is Cutting Into Cosmetic Procedures." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081028120947.htm>.
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. (2008, October 29). Consumers And Plastic Surgeons Say Economy Is Cutting Into Cosmetic Procedures. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081028120947.htm
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Consumers And Plastic Surgeons Say Economy Is Cutting Into Cosmetic Procedures." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081028120947.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) — New research shows that women who suffer from PTSD are three times more likely to develop a food addiction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) — Corporal punishment in the United States is on the decline, but there is renewed debate over its use after Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was charged with child abuse. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) — The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins