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Psychodynamic Treatment May Help Depression, Study Suggests

Date:
November 3, 2008
Source:
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Summary:
There are few studies comparing the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) and pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder. A group of Finnish investigators conducted a comparative study on the efficacy of STPP versus fluoxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care setting.

There are few studies comparing the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) and pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder. A group of finnish investigators conducted a comparative study on the efficacy of STPP versus fluoxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care setting.

Fifty-one patients with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV) of mild or moderate severity were recruited through occupational health services providing primary health care. Patients were randomized to receive either STPP (1 session/week) or fluoxetine treatment (20-40 mg/day) for 16 weeks. The outcome measures included the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS).

At the end of the study, intent-to-treat analyses indicated that both treatments were highly effective in reducing the HDRS (p < 0.0001) and BDI (p < 0.0001) scores, as well as in improving functional ability (SOFAS; p < 0.0001), with no statistically significant differences between the treatments.

Of those 40 subjects who completed the follow-up, 57% in the psychotherapy group and 68% in the fluoxetine group showed full remission (HDRS 7) after 4 months. The Authors concluded that both STPP and pharmacological treatment with fluoxetine are effective in reducing symptoms and in improving functional ability of primary care patients with mild or moderate depression.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Psychodynamic Treatment May Help Depression, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103121313.htm>.
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. (2008, November 3). Psychodynamic Treatment May Help Depression, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103121313.htm
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "Psychodynamic Treatment May Help Depression, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103121313.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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