Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Prototyping With Industrial Robots

Date:
November 14, 2008
Source:
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Summary:
A shipping company must exercise patience whenever it needs a new a ship's propeller: its production is time consuming because a foundry workers must first fashion a model and a mold based on it. Industrial robots will support them in the future.

An industrial robot milling a mold for a large part.
Credit: Copyright Fraunhofer IFF

A shipping company must exercise patience whenever it needs a new a ship’s propeller: Its production is time consuming because a foundry workers must first fashion a model and a mold based on it. Industrial robots will support them in the future.

Related Articles


Ship’s propellers, parts for wind energy converters, turbine housings – such large-volume castings can only be produced with special molds. The procedure is elaborate and cost-intensive because foundry workers must still perform most of the work steps manually.

In the future, industrial robots will support skilled workers when they fabricate molds: Together with their partner firm Modell- und Formenbau GmbH Sachsen-Anhalt MFSA, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation IFF in Magdeburg have developed a procedure for this. “The robots produce large-volume models and molds faster and less expensively. Depending on the process, this can cut costs by up to a third.

Various tools can be combined flexibly with one another,” explains Torsten Felsch, Research Manager at the Fraunhofer IFF. The molds are milled directly out of a block – without losing time on a product model. KUKA Roboter GmbH in Augsburg is supporting this project: Thus, among other things, a standard KUKA robot is being utilized. The Fraunhofer researchers are scrutinizing the basics of robot use: Which milling path is optimal? How can algorithms be used to calculate it? What tools are best for robot use? Their colleagues at MFSA are implementing the findings directly in production.

Another method is often more cost effective for large quantities than direct milling: Since a mold is destroyed when a finished casting is extracted, workers first fashion a model of the casting to be produced, which serves as a pattern for molds. “The models are built up in layers. Usually, a worker saws out the individual sheets, bonds them atop one another and then machines the shape with a milling machine. Industrial robots will be able to take this over in the future,” says Felsch.

How exactly does that function though? First, the KUKA robot mixes a liquid two-component foam and applies one foam layer after another to the machined surface. Since an average layer is two centimeters thick, a relatively rough model of a casting is produced. Just as in direct milling, the software then supplies the milling parameters to the robot: Where must how much material be removed? What tool is best to use? The robotic machining processes are currently still in development. They could be supporting foundries in their work in one to two years.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Prototyping With Industrial Robots." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110112107.htm>.
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. (2008, November 14). Prototyping With Industrial Robots. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110112107.htm
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Prototyping With Industrial Robots." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081110112107.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Computers & Math News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

EU Pushes Google For Worldwide Right To Be Forgotten

EU Pushes Google For Worldwide Right To Be Forgotten

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — Privacy regulators recommend Google expand its requested removals to apply to all its web domains. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Predictions Of Tablets' Demise Sound Familiar

Predictions Of Tablets' Demise Sound Familiar

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — The tablet's days are numbered, at least according to a recent IDC report. The market-research firm paints a grim outlook for tablets. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FCC Forces T-Mobile To Alert Customers Of Data Throttling

FCC Forces T-Mobile To Alert Customers Of Data Throttling

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — T-Mobile and the FCC have reached an agreement requiring the company to alert customers when it throttles their data speeds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins