Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Electrical Drive Systems: World Record Of One Million Revolutions Per Minute Set

Date:
November 16, 2008
Source:
ETH Zuerich
Summary:
In future it can be expected that the drill used in material processing will become even faster and the compressor used for vehicles and airplanes even more compact. In order to drive these rotary applications directly, efficiently and in a controlled fashion, there must be electrical drive systems with the appropriate rpm and engine power. Up to now, industrially-deployed motors have normally reached 250,000 revolutions per minute. Now, however, researchers from ETH Zurich's Department of Power Electronics have developed a drive system in cooperation with its industrial partners that can achieve over 1,000,000 rpm.

World record speed of an electrical drive system set -- one million revolutions per minute.
Credit: Image courtesy of ETH Zuerich

In future it can be expected that the drill used in material processing will become even faster and the compressor used for vehicles and airplanes even more compact. In order to drive these rotary applications directly, efficiently and in a controlled fashion, there must be electrical drive systems with the appropriate rpm and engine power.

Up to now, industrially-deployed motors have normally reached 250,000 revolutions per minute. Now, however, researchers from ETH Zurich’s Department of Power Electronics have developed a drive system in cooperation with its industrial partners that can achieve over 1,000,000 rpm.

Small, low-loss and highly efficient

The new drive system generates an output of 100 watts and is barely bigger than a matchbox. The rotor construction has a titanium shell that is able to withstand extreme centrifugal forces and the ball bearings are optimized for extremely high speeds. Until now, it has been the case that the higher the rotational speed, the more losses there are. But the researchers from ETH Zurich have now managed to solve the problem with an especially low-loss stator.

Ultra-thin copper wire is used for the windings which are inserted in a cylinder made of special iron previously unused for machines. In addition, the machine is fed by electronics specifically designed for such engine speeds. “Our aim of breaking the million barrier was clear but the breakthrough was only possible thanks to the new technology,” explains Christof Zwyssig, a post-graduate student from the Department of Power Electronics at ETH Zurich.

The recipe for success

The drive system was brought to fruition in collaboration with industry. The machine was manufactured by the German company, ATE GmbH, which specializes in the development of highly efficient electrical drives. The ball bearings came from the company, myonic, which is also based in Germany and has been manufacturing high precision miniature ball bearings for over 70 years. The construction of the whole system, the development of the electronics and the regulation of the drive system, however, was developed at ETH Zurich’s Department of Power Electronics.

The right turn for smaller cell phones

Based upon the results of this research, Christof Zwyssig and Martin Bartholet, also a post-graduate in the same department, founded the spin-off company, Celeroton, in August 2008. It will make the lab partners industrially viable with a view to providing ultra-high revolution electrical drive systems for different branches of industry and areas of application. Celeroton is set to become a supplier for manufacturers of, for example, fast-spinning drill or milling machines.

The trend towards increasingly smaller cell phones and other electrical appliances means that increasingly smaller holes have to be drilled for the electronics. This is only possible using a drive system that boasts a high rotational speed. “In my view, a spin-off company is the most direct way of transferring research results to industry. Our findings will rapidly be converted into concrete applications and products,” explains Johann Kolar, Head of the Department of Power Electronics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by ETH Zuerich. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

ETH Zuerich. "Electrical Drive Systems: World Record Of One Million Revolutions Per Minute Set." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081114081213.htm>.
ETH Zuerich. (2008, November 16). Electrical Drive Systems: World Record Of One Million Revolutions Per Minute Set. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081114081213.htm
ETH Zuerich. "Electrical Drive Systems: World Record Of One Million Revolutions Per Minute Set." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081114081213.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins