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Scientists Produce Illusion Of Body Swapping

Date:
December 2, 2008
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Cognitive neuroscientists have succeeded in making subjects perceive the bodies of mannequins and other people as their own.

Set-up. Experimental set-up to induce illusory ownership of an artificial body (left panel). The participant could see the mannequin's body from the perspective of the mannequin's head (right panel).
Credit: Petkova VI, Ehrsson HH, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003832.g001

Cognitive neuroscientists at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet (KI) have succeeded in making subjects perceive the bodies of mannequins and other people as their own. 

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In the first experiment, the head of a shop dummy was fitted with two cameras connected to two small screens placed in front of the subjects' eyes, so that they saw what the dummy "saw." When the dummy's camera eyes and a subject's head were directed downwards, the subject saw the dummy's body where he/she would normally have seen his/her own.

The illusion of body-swapping was created when the scientist touched the stomach of both with two sticks. The subject could then see that the mannequin's stomach was being touched while feeling (but not seeing) a similar sensation on his/her own stomach. As a result, the subject developed a powerful sensation that the mannequin's body was his/her own.

"This shows how easy it is to change the brain's perception of the physical self," says Henrik Ehrsson, who led the project. "By manipulating sensory impressions, it's possible to fool the self not only out of its body but into other bodies too."

In another experiment, the camera was mounted onto another person's head. When this person and the subject turned towards each other to shake hands, the subject perceived the camera-wearer's body as his/her own.

"The subjects see themselves shaking hands from the outside, but experience it as another person," says Valeria Petkova, who co-conducted the study with Dr Ehrsson. "The sensory impression from the hand-shake is perceived as though coming from the new body, rather than the subject's own."

The strength of the illusion was confirmed by the subjects' exhibiting stress reactions when a knife was held to the camera wearer's arm but not when it was held to their own.

The illusion also worked even when the two people differed in appearance or were of different sexes. However, it was not possible to fool the self into identifying with a non-humanoid object, such as a chair or a large block.

The object of the projects was to learn more about how the brain constructs an internal image of the body. The knowledge that the sense of corporal identification/self-perception can be manipulated to make people believe that they have a new body is of potential practical use in virtual reality applications and robot technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Petkova VI, Ehrsson HH. If I Were You: Perceptual Illusion of Body Swapping. PLoS ONE, 3(12): e3832 DOI: 0.1371/journal.pone.0003832

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Scientists Produce Illusion Of Body Swapping." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202115148.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2008, December 2). Scientists Produce Illusion Of Body Swapping. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202115148.htm
Public Library of Science. "Scientists Produce Illusion Of Body Swapping." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202115148.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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