Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Therapy Prevents Dangerous Side Effect For Lymphoma Patients, Study Suggests

Date:
December 9, 2008
Source:
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Summary:
Patients respond well to a new three-drug combination for indolent B cell lymphoma that also spares them prolonged, potentially lethal, suppression of blood production in the bone marrow, researchers say.

Patients respond well to a new three-drug combination for indolent B cell lymphoma that also spares them prolonged, potentially lethal, suppression of blood production in the bone marrow, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report December 9 at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Pentostatin, cyclophosphamide and rituximab together are providing the same remission rate as other combinations but with minimal long-term bone marrow suppression, said study presenter Felipe Samaniego, M.D., associate professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Lymphoma and Melanoma.

Myelosuppression leads to production of fewer red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. When prolonged, it can lead to myelodysplastic syndrome, which comprises several conditions that cause potentially lethal insufficient blood production.

"The worst outcome of long-term myelosuppression for indolent B cell lymphoma patients is myelodysplastic syndrome," Samaniego said. "In this study, out of 80 patients, none developed MDS."

And 77 of 80 (96 percent) experienced either complete remission or unconfirmed complete remission. Some did have low blood counts, but all were short-term. Overall, the combination is well-tolerated, the research team reported.

Prolonged myelosuppression also makes treatment much more difficult if a patient's lymphoma recurs, Samaniego said. "Patients treated with myelosuppressing agents have a difficult time tolerating another round of chemotherapy if their lymphoma comes back."

Indolent B cell lymphomas comprise follicular lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and marginal zone lymphoma. These slow-growing but potentially lethal cancers are the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Samaniego and colleagues have been testing new drug combinations against indolent B cell lymphoma that reduce myelosuppression.

Two years ago, a combination of fludarabine, mitoxantrone and dexamethasone with rituximab and interferon alpha reduced the incidence of MDS to 4 percent of patients, down from a historical rate of around 10 percent.

The key ingredient in pushing the MDS rate to zero, Samaniego says, was substitution of fludarabine with pentostatin. Both are nucleoside analogs, which interfere with DNA reproduction, and target lymphoid cells, making them attractive drugs for lymphomas.

Earlier research indicated that pentostatin is less toxic to bone marrow than other members of this drug class.

"The PCR combination is a very promising therapy for indolent B cell lymphoma," Samaniego said.

Co-authors with Samaniego are Michelle Fanale, M.D., Barbara Pro, M.D., F.B. Hagemeister, M.D., Peter McLaughlin, M.D., Jorge Romaguera, M.D., Sattva Neelapu, M.D., Maria Anna Rodriguez, M.D., Luis Fayad, M.D., Anas Younes, M.D., and Larry Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., all of the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "New Therapy Prevents Dangerous Side Effect For Lymphoma Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209125834.htm>.
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. (2008, December 9). New Therapy Prevents Dangerous Side Effect For Lymphoma Patients, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209125834.htm
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "New Therapy Prevents Dangerous Side Effect For Lymphoma Patients, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081209125834.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins