Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Smoking Associated With Increased Risk For Colorectal Cancer And Death

Date:
December 18, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
An analysis of previous studies indicates that smoking is significantly associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer and death, according to a new article.

An analysis of previous studies indicates that smoking is significantly associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer and death, according to a new article.

Although tobacco was responsible for approximately 5.4 million deaths in 2005, there are still an estimated 1.3 billion smokers in the world. While a number of cancers are attributable to smoking, the link between cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been inconsistent among studies. "Because smoking can potentially be controlled by individual and population-related measures, detecting a link between CRC and smoking could help reduce the burden of the world's third most common tumor, which currently causes more than 500,000 annual deaths worldwide. In the United States alone, an estimate of approximately 50,000 deaths from CRC would have occurred in 2008," the authors write.

Edoardo Botteri, M.Sc., of the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis to review and summarize published data examining the link between smoking and CRC incidence and death.

The researchers identified 106 observational studies, and the meta-analysis was based on a total of nearly 40,000 new cases of CRC. For the analysis on incidence, smoking was associated with an 18 percent increased risk of CRC. The researchers also found a statistically significant dose-relationship with an increasing number of pack-years (number of packs of cigarettes smoked/day, multiplied by years of consumption) and cigarettes per day. However, the association was statistically significant only after 30 years of smoking.

Seventeen studies were included in the analysis of mortality, which indicated that smokers have a 25 percent increased risk of dying from CRC than people who have never smoked. There also was an increase in risk of CRC death with increasing number of cigarettes per day smoked and for longer duration of smoking. For both incidence and death, the association was stronger for cancer of the rectum than of the colon.

"Smoking has not been considered so far in the stratification of individuals for CRC screening. However, several studies reported that CRC occurs earlier in smokers, particularly in those with heavy tobacco consumption, and our previous and present findings provide strong evidence of the detrimental effect of cigarette smoking on the development of adenomatous [benign tumor] polyps and CRC. We believe that smoking represents an important factor to consider when deciding on the age at which CRC screening should begin, either by lowering the age in smokers or increasing the age in non-smokers," the authors write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Edoardo Botteri; Simona Iodice; Vincenzo Bagnardi; Sara Raimondi; Albert B. Lowenfels; Patrick Maisonneuve. Smoking and Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis. JAMA, 2008;300(23):2765-2778 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Smoking Associated With Increased Risk For Colorectal Cancer And Death." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081216161050.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, December 18). Smoking Associated With Increased Risk For Colorectal Cancer And Death. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081216161050.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Smoking Associated With Increased Risk For Colorectal Cancer And Death." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081216161050.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Researchers say women who diet at a young age are at greater risk of developing harmful health habits, including eating disorders and alcohol abuse. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

Newsy (July 29, 2014) If you've been looking for love online, there's a chance somebody has been looking at how you're looking. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins