Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Finds Optimal Type Of Dialysis Treatment Differs Among Kidney Disease Patients

Date:
December 17, 2008
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
For kidney disease patients who need to undergo dialysis, one type of treatment is not best for all, according to a new study. The findings indicate that certain patient characteristics should be factored into decisions on whether to choose hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

For kidney disease patients who need to undergo dialysis, one type of treatment is not best for all, according to a study appearing in the January 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The findings indicate that certain patient characteristics should be factored into decisions on whether to choose hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

Related Articles


During hemodialysis, a patient's blood is allowed to flow through a filter that removes wastes and extra fluids, and the clean blood is then returned to the body. During peritoneal dialysis, a catheter fills a patient's abdomen with a dialysis solution that draws wastes and extra fluid from the blood into the abdominal cavity; the wastes and fluid are then drained from the body and discarded.

While both dialysis procedures are effective treatments for kidney disease, it is not clear which is best for prolonging patients' survival. Previous research on this topic has produced conflicting results.

In the United States, peritoneal dialysis is used in a small minority of the dialysis population, usually in younger and healthier patients. In contrast, in Australia and New Zealand up to 40% of dialysis patients receive peritoneal dialysis, making these countries potentially better regions for conducting studies that compare outcomes from hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

To compare the survival rates between patients receiving hemodialysis and those receiving peritoneal dialysis, Stephen McDonald, MD, of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide, Australia, and his colleagues examined data from 25,287 patients in the Australia & New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry who were still receiving dialysis 90 days after entry in the registry.

The researchers found that death rates were significantly lower during the 90 to 365 day period of the study among those being treated with peritoneal dialysis at day 90. However, this effect varied depending on patients' age and health. Younger patients (<60 years) without other medical conditions had a survival advantage with peritoneal treatment, but other groups did not. Also, after 12 months, the use of peritoneal dialysis at day 90 was associated with significantly increased mortality. This indicates that the results change over time—while peritoneal dialysis might give a survival advantage to some patients in the short term, in the long term it increases patients' risk of dying compared with hemodialysis.

There are many reasons why one type of dialysis is chosen over another, including quality of life, patient satisfaction, and practice expertise. This study indicates that mortality risks should also be factored into choices between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. For younger patients without other medical conditions, peritoneal dialysis is a reasonable short term therapy, but for other groups, hemodialysis may be a better choice. "Our data suggest caution in the use of peritoneal dialysis in many patients, particularly when this therapy is continued beyond 1 to 2 years," the authors wrote. However, the researchers noted that their observational study has some inherent limitations, and randomized clinical trials are needed to definitively determine which type of dialysis treatment patients should receive.

There was no specific funding for this study. All study authors have received speaker's honoraria, advisor's fees, research funding, or travel grants from various pharmaceutical companies, including AMGEN Australia, Fresenius Australia, Solvay Pharmaceuticals, Genzyme Australia, Jansen-Cilag, Roche Products (NZ) Ltd, Novartis (NZ) Ltd, and Baxter Healthcare.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. McDonald et al. Relationship between Dialysis Modality and Mortality. J Am Soc Nephrol, 2008; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2007111188

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Study Finds Optimal Type Of Dialysis Treatment Differs Among Kidney Disease Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081217190338.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2008, December 17). Study Finds Optimal Type Of Dialysis Treatment Differs Among Kidney Disease Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081217190338.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Study Finds Optimal Type Of Dialysis Treatment Differs Among Kidney Disease Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081217190338.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

AP (Oct. 31, 2014) Officials in the Washington area showed off Ebola response measures being taken at Dulles International Airport and the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins