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Structural Defects Introduced Into Carbon Nanotubes Could Lead The Way To Carbon Nanotube Circuits

Date:
January 15, 2009
Source:
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Summary:
Structural defects introduced into carbon nanotubes could lead the way to carbon nanotube circuits, new research shows.

Structural defects introduced into carbon nanotubes could lead the way to carbon nanotube circuits, research led by Vincent Meunier of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computer Science and Mathematics Division shows.

Individual carbon nanotubes are excellent conductors of electricity, but that conductivity goes away when they are connected together into circuits because the junctions act as barriers, and the connections are effective insulators.

However, work conducted at the Department of Energy's Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at ORNL and Mexico's National Laboratory for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research shows that imperfections in the carbon lattice structure, which is typically hexagonal, improve conductivity between nanotubes.

The finding could lead to nanoscale circuits that enable more compact and more powerful computers made of carbon nanotube materials that outperform silicon.

The research is published in the journal ACS Nano. The work is supported by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "Structural Defects Introduced Into Carbon Nanotubes Could Lead The Way To Carbon Nanotube Circuits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090113174531.htm>.
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (2009, January 15). Structural Defects Introduced Into Carbon Nanotubes Could Lead The Way To Carbon Nanotube Circuits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090113174531.htm
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "Structural Defects Introduced Into Carbon Nanotubes Could Lead The Way To Carbon Nanotube Circuits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090113174531.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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