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Rape In War Demands More Attention From Medical Editors And Health Professionals

Date:
January 26, 2009
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Rape in war is common, devastating, and too often ignored, says a new editorial in PLoS Medicine.
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FULL STORY

Rape in war is common, devastating, and too often ignored, says a new editorial in the journal PLoS Medicine. The staggering toll of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) since 1991—5.5 million deaths, 1.5 million displaced people, and up to half a million victims of sexual violence—demands attention be paid to the unconscionable use of rape as a weapon of war, which has also been documented for conflicts in Burma, Sudan, and the former Yugoslavia, among others.

The International Criminal Tribunal recognized rape as a crime of genocide under international law in 1994, but rape continues to be conducted with impunity in many armed conflicts, leaving women and communities devastated. Rape is still largely ignored by the international community, the editorial argues.

"Medical journalists and editors, along with health care professionals, have the authority, the skills, and the audience to draw the world's attention to the brutality and intolerability of sexual violence in armed conflicts," say the PLoS Medicine editors. "Medical professionals are powerful lobbyists, whose recognition of the devastation could galvanize support for the work of humanitarian organizations and advocacy groups in documenting sexual atrocities and holding states accountable when human rights and international law are violated."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rape in War Is Common, Devastating, and Too Often Ignored. PLoS Med, 6(1): e1000021 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000021

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Rape In War Demands More Attention From Medical Editors And Health Professionals." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090126203201.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2009, January 26). Rape In War Demands More Attention From Medical Editors And Health Professionals. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090126203201.htm
Public Library of Science. "Rape In War Demands More Attention From Medical Editors And Health Professionals." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090126203201.htm (accessed April 26, 2015).

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