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Acupuncture 'Probably Ineffective' In Treatment Of Hot Flushes

Date:
April 8, 2009
Source:
International Menopause Society
Summary:
Acupuncture cannot be shown to have any positive effect on hot flashes during menopause. This is the conclusion of a systematic review of literature.
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FULL STORY

Acupuncture cannot be shown to have any positive effect on hot flushes during the menopause. This is the conclusion of a systematic review of literature by three groups in Daejon, Busan (South Korea) and Exeter (UK), published in the current edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climacteric.

Many women are concerned by the unfavourable publicity given to HRT use, but still have to deal with the symptoms which can occur during and after the menopause. A significant minority of women look for alternatives to HRT to deal with these symptoms. Often these alternatives are untested, and it can be impossible to balance the risks and benefits of these treatments against the risks and benefits of conventional treatments or the discomfort of untreated menopause.

The researchers reviewed studies on the use of acupuncture for the relief of hot flushes during the menopause. They identified 106 studies in total, which they eventually narrowed down to the six most relevant to the study. These six studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), which included testing the effects of real acupuncture against the effect of sham acupuncture. Only one RCT reported favorable effect of acupuncture on the frequency and severity of hot flush after 4 weeks follow-up, while the other five RCTs demonstrated no such effects.

Researchers caution that the quality of good studies is not great, and that because of this the use of acupuncture cannot be completely ruled out. However, the available literature indicates that acupuncture does not seem to be effective in the treatment of menopausal hot flushes.

Lead researcher, Dr Myeong Soo Lee (Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, South Korea) said: 'Although the availability of good Randomised Controlled Trials is too small to draw any firm conclusion, in general the evidence from sham-controlled RCTs for the effects of acupuncture for treating menopausal hot flush is not convincing. We would always recommend that women wanting relief from menopausal symptoms consult their clinician before undertaking any course of treatment.'

Commenting, Dr David Sturdee (President of the International Menopause Society) said: 'There's no doubt that many women need relief from the symptoms associated with the menopause. They need to make sure that the treatment they choose works, and is right for them. I would always recommend that a woman consult her clinician before starting any treatment.'


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by International Menopause Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lee et al. Acupuncture for treating menopausal hot flushes: a systematic review. Climacteric, 2009; 12 (1): 16 DOI: 10.1080/13697130802566980

Cite This Page:

International Menopause Society. "Acupuncture 'Probably Ineffective' In Treatment Of Hot Flushes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407074949.htm>.
International Menopause Society. (2009, April 8). Acupuncture 'Probably Ineffective' In Treatment Of Hot Flushes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407074949.htm
International Menopause Society. "Acupuncture 'Probably Ineffective' In Treatment Of Hot Flushes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407074949.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

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