Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New, Simple Method Identifies Preterm Infants At Risk Of Eye Disease

Date:
April 15, 2009
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
A simple way of establishing which preterm infants are at risk of developing the eye disease ROP is to follow their weight gain. A new study suggests that following weekly weight development might replace the need for considerably more expensive ophthalmological examinations.

A simple way of establishing which preterm infants are at risk of developing the eye disease ROP is to follow their weight gain. A new study from the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, suggests that following weekly weight development might replace the need for considerably more expensive ophthalmological examinations.

Every year around 1000 Swedish infants are born more than two months prematurely. Preterm infants are at increased risk of damage to several important organs, including the brain, lungs, guts and eyes. Around 350 of these infants develop the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) which, if left untreated, can threaten their sight. Ten per cent, or around one hundred, of the preterm infants need the same treatment to prevent blindness.

“In the past 50 years it has been routine for all infants born very prematurely to be examined several times by ophthalmologists to identify children who need treatment for ROP, but this expensive method of screening can now perhaps be replaced by a considerably simpler and cheaper method, so that ophthalmological examination can be avoided in most cases,” says Professor Ann Hellström of Sahlgrenska Academy.

The research team has previously identified another important link between preterm birth and vascular disease in the eye, the protein IGF-1, which is strongly linked to the infant's weight gain. Assisted by statisticians at the University of Gothenburg, the researchers have developed an assessment model known as WINROP (Weight IGF-1 Neonatal ROP), which is based on weekly measurements of the infant's weight and analyses of the serum levels of IGF-1. “However, one would prefer not to take any blood samples from the preterm infants, and therefore we wanted to investigate whether our surveillance model worked if we only used the infant’s weight. We found that it works extremely well,” says Professor Hellström.

In a review of medical records, information on the weekly weights of 350 infants was entered into the model, and the outcome was compared with the ophthalmological examinations performed on them.

“All infants at risk were on average identified a few months before the ophthalmologist had seen signs of ROP requiring treatment. The method could therefore not just save money but also make it possible for infants with eye problems to be identified earlier,” says Professor Hellström.

The new WINROP model is now to be evaluated in a large British study and also on  data from Brazilian and American infants. The material will be analysed during the summer of 2009.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ann Hellström, Anna-Lena Hård, Eva Engström, Aimon Niklasson, Eva Andersson, Lois Smith, Chatarina Löfqvist. Early Weight Gain Predicts Retinopathy in Preterm Infants: New, Simple, Efficient Approach to Screening. Pediatrics, (in press)

Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "New, Simple Method Identifies Preterm Infants At Risk Of Eye Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075142.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2009, April 15). New, Simple Method Identifies Preterm Infants At Risk Of Eye Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075142.htm
University of Gothenburg. "New, Simple Method Identifies Preterm Infants At Risk Of Eye Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075142.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) — Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins