Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Educating Referring Clinicians About Advanced Imaging Leads To Drop In Imaging Exams

Date:
April 23, 2009
Source:
American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
Unnecessary advanced imaging (CT, MRI and nuclear medicine) can be significantly reduced by providing a simple intervention of education to ordering physicians of the risks, benefits and alternatives of various imaging modalities, according to a study performed at Staten Island University Hospital in Staten Island, NY.

nnecessary advanced imaging (CT, MRI and nuclear medicine) can be significantly reduced by providing a simple intervention of education to ordering physicians of the risks, benefits and alternatives of various imaging modalities, according to a study performed at Staten Island University Hospital in Staten Island, NY.

“Given the increased awareness of radiation from radiologic studies and increasing costs of medical imaging we hypothesized that a simple intervention of education will reduce unneeded studies and thereby decrease cost and radiation doses to patients,” said Joseph Platnick, MD, lead author of the study. “The study found that targeted education of referring clinicians led to a 26% reduction in the number of advanced radiologic studies ordered. There was an 18% reduction of CTs in the study period,” he said.

“CTs and nuclear medicine studies impart radiation to patients. Many patients have multiple scans over numerous admissions and these radiation doses are cumulative and have been shown to increase the patients’ risk of cancer,” said Dr. Platnick.

“While advanced imaging certainly plays a major and necessary role in patient care there are times when studies are not needed. Eliminating these studies is imperative to control the ballooning costs of healthcare without compromising on health care,” he said.

“We hope our study will be reproduced in many other departments across many hospitals. The cumulative effect will significantly reduce patient radiation exposure thereby possibly reducing some iatrogenically induced cancers,” said Dr. Platnick.

“In the future, more rigorous evaluations are needed to expand the appropriateness criteria already in place to better assist the referring clinicians in obtaining advanced imaging,” he said.

This study will be exhibited at the 2009 ARRS Annual Meeting in Boston, MA, April 26-30.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Roentgen Ray Society. "Educating Referring Clinicians About Advanced Imaging Leads To Drop In Imaging Exams." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423154245.htm>.
American Roentgen Ray Society. (2009, April 23). Educating Referring Clinicians About Advanced Imaging Leads To Drop In Imaging Exams. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423154245.htm
American Roentgen Ray Society. "Educating Referring Clinicians About Advanced Imaging Leads To Drop In Imaging Exams." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423154245.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins