Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Knowledge Unlocks Key To Healthier Options For Dialysis Patients

Date:
April 23, 2009
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
Kidney disease patients who are educated about dialysis are more likely to undergo a standard but under-utilized dialysis-related procedure than less knowledgeable patients, according to a study. The findings suggest that patients' knowledge about dialysis affects whether they receive optimal care and that physicians should work to educate their patients.

Kidney disease patients who are educated about dialysis are more likely to undergo a standard but under-utilized dialysis-related procedure than less knowledgeable patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). The findings suggest that patients' knowledge about dialysis affects whether they receive optimal care and that physicians should work to educate their patients.

Related Articles


Individuals on dialysis have their blood removed, filtered, and then returned several times a week—a process that can be performed through a removable tube or catheter or through a permanent vascular access. One common type of permanent vascular access involves fusing an artery with a vein to create a large blood vessel that can be easily accessed to collect blood. Research has shown that patients are less likely to die from kidney disease complications if they use permanent vascular access rather than catheters. Catheters can clog, become infected, and cause narrowing of the veins in which they are placed. Despite these complications, a large percentage of kidney disease patients use catheters.

Informing patients about permanent vascular access, and dialysis in general, may be one way to increase its use and to improve patients' health. To test this hypothesis, Kerri Cavanaugh, MD (Vanderbilt University Medical Center), and colleagues studied 490 patients initiating chronic dialysis. They tested the patients' knowledge about dialysis and looked to see if this was associated with whether patients used catheters or permanent vascular access at the start of dialysis and several months later.

The researchers found that patients who were older, had fewer years of education, or were of a non-white race were more likely to have less knowledge about dialysis. Patients with more knowledge about dialysis were about a third more likely than less knowledgeable patients to use permanent vascular access rather than a catheter at the start of dialysis as well as six months later.

"Evaluation of patient dialysis knowledge is a rapid and easy method to identify patients who may be at higher risk of not using [permanent vascular] access both at dialysis initiation and after starting dialysis, and therefore may be candidates for targeted educational interventions," the authors concluded. "Additional studies are needed to explore the impact of patient dialysis knowledge and its improvement after educational interventions, on vascular access in hemodialysis," they added.

The RightStart (RS) program was supported by a grant from Amgen, Inc, which did not provide support for the analyses presented, nor review the manuscript. This work was presented, in part, at the National Kidney Foundation Clinical Meetings 2007, Orlando, Florida. Rebecca Wingard, RN; Raymond Hakim, MD, PhD; Tom Elasy, MD; and T. Alp Ikizler, MD are recognized as co-authors. Dr. Cavanaugh is supported by a National Kidney Foundation Young Investigator Grant and grant K23 DK080952-01, Dr. Ikizler by grant K24 DK62849, and Dr. Elasy by grants K24 DK77875 and P60 DK 020593 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Patient Dialysis Knowledge is Associated with Permanent Arteriovenous Access Use in Chronic Hemodialysis," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on April 23, 2009, doi 10.2215/CJN.04580908.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kerri L. Cavanaugh, Rebecca L. Wingard, Raymond M. Hakim, Tom A. Elasy, T. Alp Ikizler. Patient Dialysis Knowledge is Associated with Permanent Arteriovenous Access Use in Chronic Hemodialysis. Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology, 2009; DOI: 10.2215/CJN.04580908

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Knowledge Unlocks Key To Healthier Options For Dialysis Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423180229.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2009, April 23). Knowledge Unlocks Key To Healthier Options For Dialysis Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423180229.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Knowledge Unlocks Key To Healthier Options For Dialysis Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423180229.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Following the closure of schools and universities in Guinea because of the Ebola virus, students look for temporary work or gather in makeshift classrooms to catch up on their syllabus. Duration: 02:14 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

AFP (Nov. 20, 2014) UN Resident Coordinator David McLachlan-Karr and WHO representative in the country Daniel Kertesz updated the media on the UN Ebola response on Wednesday. Duration: 00:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Reuters - US Online Video (Nov. 20, 2014) U.S. Congress hears from a victim and company officials as it holds a hearing on the safety of Takata airbags after reports of injuries. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins