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Generics Less Effective, Less Safe Than Branded Medications In Treating Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Study Finds

Date:
April 26, 2009
Source:
American Urological Association
Summary:
Men with lower urinary tract symptoms taking generic drugs may be more likely to have less effective results and more adverse events than if they were using branded medications, according to new data from researchers in New York. Generic substitutes for alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, two classes of medications used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in men, are less effective than their branded counterparts.

Men taking generic drugs may be more likely to have less effective results and more adverse events than if they were using branded medications, according to new data from researchers in New York. Researchers presented a study at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) showing that generic substitutes for alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), two classes of medications used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men, are less effective than their branded counterparts.

Over eight weeks, the study tested 212 men taking branded alpha blockers or 5ARIs with an average age of 64, who were switched to generic alternatives by their primary care physician or due to insurance coverage. The researchers measured the efficacy of the medications using several parameters, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), peak flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine (PVR), voiding diary information, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), ejaculatory function and the prevalence of adverse events.

In the men who were switched to generic medications, the IPSS and PVR rates increased and Qmax decreased. In addition, the men experienced several new side effects, including dizziness (4.6 percent), nasal congestion (3.2 percent) and ejaculatory dysfunction (3.6 percent) for those switching alpha blockers, and ejaculatory dysfunction (4.7 percent) and erectile dysfunction (5.8 percent) for those switching to generic 5-ARIs.

"This preliminary study shows that some generics are not as effective as their branded counterparts and that men should consult a physician if a generic alternative is not providing results. Given that this is an early study, interpretation should be cautious as patients were not blinded as to which medication they were receiving and there may be a bias against generic medications on the part of patients," said Kevin McVary, MD, an AUA spokesman. "Often, men switch because of cost or insurance company regulations; but, it is important to ensure efficacy and consider potential side effects prior to switching medications. A physician should be able to monitor the patient and may recommend switching back to the branded medication if efficacy decreases or side effects increase while taking a generic medication."

Kaplan, S; Chung, D; Sandhu, J; Te, A. Generic substitutes are neither as safe nor effective as branded medications: experience in men treated for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). J Urol, suppl. 2009: 181, 4, abstract 1799


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Urological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Urological Association. "Generics Less Effective, Less Safe Than Branded Medications In Treating Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090426075450.htm>.
American Urological Association. (2009, April 26). Generics Less Effective, Less Safe Than Branded Medications In Treating Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090426075450.htm
American Urological Association. "Generics Less Effective, Less Safe Than Branded Medications In Treating Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090426075450.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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