Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Importance Of Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots Affirmed

Date:
May 11, 2009
Source:
American College of Medical Genetics
Summary:
Residual dried blood spots are vital to newborn screening, according to experts. There has been some debate whether these specimens should be destroyed after screening but experts reinforce the value of the residual spots for their use in improving newborn screening and child health.

The American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) has issued a new Position Statement on the Importance of Residual Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots. In May 2006, ACMG recommended that all newborns in the United States be uniformly screened for 29 conditions.

Related Articles


Tremendous progress has been made in implementing broader and more consistent newborn screening since then and it is estimated that thousands of babies' lives have been saved or have been spared from serious disease as a result of the expanded NBS. A critical aspect of newborn screening is the "dried blood spot, filter card" which provides the specimen on which the screening is done. The left-over sample is useful in follow-up testing and other uses aimed at ensuring high quality newborn screening in the United States.

"Residual dried blood spots are vital to effective newborn screening across the United States," said Michael S. Watson, PhD, FACMG, Executive Director of the American College of Medical Genetics. "There has been some debate recently whether the residual dried blood spots should be destroyed after screening and the ACMG has released this statement to convey accurate information about the use of the residual dried blood spots as well as to reinforce the value of the residual spots for their use in improving newborn screening and child health."

The Position Statement affirms:

  • Residual newborn screening dried blood filter spots are a valuable national resource that can contribute significantly to the health of our children.
  • Newborn screening blood spots are stored with rigorous control and respect for privacy and confidentiality to protect the public.

If a state decides that newborn screening blood spots should not be retained or used for anything more than the screening test, it is critical that individuals have the option of having their children's dried blood spots deposited in a national repository which will allow for necessary studies under appropriate privacy and confidentiality protections.

Statement of Support from Newborn Screening, Consumer Advocacy and Public Health Officials:

On April 6-7, 2009, the Regional Genetics and Newborn Screening Collaboratives' National Coordinating Center (NCC) convened a meeting, which was jointly funded by HRSA MCHB/GSB and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD, to discuss state newborn screening programs with regard to the goals of the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act (PL 110-204). Meeting attendees included representatives from state NBS programs, state screening laboratories, state legal representatives, academic institutions, consumer advocacy organizations and the relevant large federal agencies as well as clinicians. The following statement was developed and agreed upon regarding the extremely high value of residual blood spots while also balancing public good with research interests and maintaining privacy and confidentiality as a central focus.

"Newborn screening (NBS) is a valuable public health prevention activity that continuously evolves to improve and optimize the health of our children. One product of the multi-faceted NBS process, the residual dried blood spots (DBS), serves as an additional valuable resource, whose benefits were discussed at length. Their overall use includes facilitating the improvement and evolution of newborn screening programs nationwide. It is envisioned that their uses will improve and change as scientific advances occur in the coming years. It is the desire of the group to encourage these developments with the continuation of appropriate stewardship to assure privacy and confidentiality. Meeting attendees agreed that moving forward policy needs to recognize the three classes of residual DBS use.

These include: 1) improvement of current screening programs; 2) introduction of new screening tests; and 3) expanding medical knowledge related to NBS."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Medical Genetics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Medical Genetics. "Importance Of Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots Affirmed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090511131414.htm>.
American College of Medical Genetics. (2009, May 11). Importance Of Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots Affirmed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090511131414.htm
American College of Medical Genetics. "Importance Of Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots Affirmed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090511131414.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins