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Binge Drinking In Childhood And Adolescence

Date:
May 22, 2009
Source:
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International
Summary:
German adolescents have a problem with binge drinking. The main change has been the increase in the number of intoxicated girls. According to the German Federal Commissioner for Narcotic Drugs, the number of adolescents admitted to hospital for alcohol poisoning has more than doubled, increasing from 9500 in 2007 to more than 23 000 in 2007. About 3800 of these patients were between 10 and 15 years old.

German adolescents have a problem with boozing. In the current edition of Deutsches Δrzteblatt International, Martin Stolle et al. of the German Center for Addiction Research in Childhood and Adolescence in Hamburg report that the main change has been the increase in the number of intoxicated girls. In their article, the authors present motivating short-term interventions to counteract secondary problems.

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According to the German Federal Commissioner for Narcotic Drugs, the number of adolescents admitted to hospital for alcohol poisoning has more than doubled, increasing from 9500 in 2007 to more than 23 000 in 2007. About 3800 of these patients were between 10 and 15 years old. Teenagers who start drinking alcohol regularly before the age of 15 have a 4-fold increased risk of becoming alcohol dependent.

The German Federal model project "Hart am Limit"("Close to the Limit/On the Edge") even starts in the emergency ambulance. The authors consider that it would be desirable to supplement this with a brief motivational intervention, based on the principle of motivational interviewing. Drinking motivation will be discussed in short individual sessions of maximally 60 minutes. Topics will include the negative consequences of drinking, such as accidents or violence. The objective is to make it clear to the adolescents that they bear responsibility for changing their own consumption behavior. Studies in the USA show that as few as one to four sessions can yield a lasting effect.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Martin Stolle, Peter-Michael Sack, Rainer Thomasius. Binge Drinking in Childhood and Adolescence. Dtsch Arztebl Int, 2009; 106(19):323%u20138 DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2009.0323

Cite This Page:

Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Binge Drinking In Childhood And Adolescence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522101844.htm>.
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. (2009, May 22). Binge Drinking In Childhood And Adolescence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522101844.htm
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Binge Drinking In Childhood And Adolescence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090522101844.htm (accessed March 3, 2015).

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