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Tribble 3 Can Induce Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

Date:
June 10, 2009
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has increased in recent years, and is one of the major causes for cryptogenic cirrhosis. Tribble 3 is a mammalian homolog of drosophila tribbles and is also a neuronal cell death-inducible putative protein kinase gene in rodents. TRB3 can block the insulin signaling pathway through the inhibition of Akt activation, which contributes to insulin resistance. It may be an important factor in the occurrence and development of NAFLD.
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Three pseudo kinases of the Tribbles family have been recently recognized, which include TRB1, TRB2 and TRB3. Recent research has found that the expression of hepatic TRB3 increased in a rat model of diabetes. TRB3 could block the insulin signaling pathway through inhibiting Akt activation, which contributes to insulin resistance.

A research article to be published on May 21, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. This research, lead by Dr. Yu-Gang Wang and his colleagues in the Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Changning Central Hospital, China, used real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology and Western blotting analysis to study the protein expression of TRB3mRNA, Akt and phosphorylation protein kinase B during the progression of NAFLD.

The expression level of TRB3mRNA in NAFLD rats was significantly higher than in normal controls. Also, the expression levels of Akt and p-Akt-Thr308 in NAFLD rats was significantly lower than the control group. Since TRB3 can block insulin signaling pathway through inhibiting Akt activation, which contributes to insulin resistance, it may be an important factor in the occurrence and development of NAFLD. This study provides an experimental basis for future studies on the role of TRB3 in NAFLD. The control of the expression level of TRB3 in liver may become a new target for NAFLD therapy.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wang YG, Shi M, Wang T, Shi T, Wei J, Wang N, Chen XM. Signal transduction mechanism of TRB3 in rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2009; 15 (19): 2329 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.15.2329

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World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Tribble 3 Can Induce Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090610124620.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2009, June 10). Tribble 3 Can Induce Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090610124620.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Tribble 3 Can Induce Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090610124620.htm (accessed August 29, 2015).

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