Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Peeling Stickers May Lead To Stretchable Electronics; New Model Enables Precise Design Of Damage-resistant Materials

Date:
June 29, 2009
Source:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Summary:
A study of stickers peeling from windows could lead to a new way to precisely control the fabrication of stretchable electronics, according to researchers.

MIT mathematician Pedro Reis demonstrates the delamination that occurs when a surface is compressed: The tape detaches from the surface and forms blisters of uniform size and spacing.
Credit: Photo by Donna Coveney

A study of stickers peeling from windows could lead to a new way to precisely control the fabrication of stretchable electronics, according to a team of researchers including one at MIT.

Stretchable electronics, which would enable electronic devices embedded into clothing, surgical gloves, electronic paper or other flexible materials, have proven difficult to engineer because the electrical wiring tends to be damaged as the material twists.

A study published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of June 15 offers a new approach to designing such circuits.

The research team did not have stretchable electronics in mind when they started, but launched the project as an analysis of the wrinkling and delamination of stickers. The small blisters that appear in stickers attached to car windows are a common example of such delamination.

"It's something that's around you all the time — but if you look at it a different way you can see something new," says Pedro Reis, applied math instructor at MIT and senior author of the PNAS paper.

Reis collaborated on the study with Dominic Vella, Jose Bico, Arezki Boudaoud and Benoit Roman of the French National Centre for Scientific Research.

Delamination commonly occurs due to different rates of heat-induced expansion between a thin film and the surface to which it is attached. Common examples are the blisters formed in stickers attached to a window, when exposed to sunlight.

Alternatively, compression of the surface can also lead to delamination. As the surface is compressed, the film bends with it until it reaches a certain energy threshold, then pops away from the surface, forming small blisters.

The researchers performed well controlled experiments to stretch and compress surfaces with thin films attached to them, and measured the dimensions of resulting blisters. From their experimental data, the team developed a theory to explain the formation, size and evolution of the blisters.

They found that blister size depends on the elasticity of the film and the substrate and the strength of adhesion between them. The team's model allows them to predict the size of the blisters that will form under specific conditions.

Though delamination is usually viewed as something to be avoided, the researchers realized that by intentionally creating delaminated surfaces, they could design devices that allow wires attached to a surface to move with the material without breaking. If the wires are already partially separated from the material, they won't break under stress from twisting and stretching of the substrate.

Other researchers have tried to create stretchable electronics by blistering the material, but the new model makes the job much easier. Using this approach, delamination can be precisely controlled by changing the strength of adhesion and the elastic properties of the film and wires. Previous work on stretchable electronic devices relied on complex microfabrication techniques to force delamination blisters to appear. Sometimes, this forces the blisters to become larger than their intrinsic size.

"Delamination blisters have a characteristic size that they try to choose for themselves," says Vella. "We've characterized this size so that in principle it can be determined just from the parameters of a given system."

Work on stretchable electronics has been ongoing over the past decade, and the technology has already been used in applications such as electronic paper and flexible displays. Prototype phones are also in the works.

The new study suggests that ultra-thin, flexible but strong materials such as graphene are ideal candidates for stretchable electronic applications.

The work was funded by the EU-NEST (New and Emerging Science and Technology) program and the French Agence National Recherche.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Peeling Stickers May Lead To Stretchable Electronics; New Model Enables Precise Design Of Damage-resistant Materials." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090615171614.htm>.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2009, June 29). Peeling Stickers May Lead To Stretchable Electronics; New Model Enables Precise Design Of Damage-resistant Materials. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090615171614.htm
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Peeling Stickers May Lead To Stretchable Electronics; New Model Enables Precise Design Of Damage-resistant Materials." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090615171614.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) — As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) — Magic Leap isn't publicizing much more than a description of its product, but it’s been enough for Google and others to invest more than $500M. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins