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Neurological Differences Support Dyslexia Subtypes

Date:
June 26, 2009
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Parts of the right hemisphere of the brains of people with dyslexia have been shown to differ from those of normal readers. Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to compare the two groups, and were able to associate the neurological differences found with different language difficulties within the dyslexic group.

Parts of the right hemisphere of the brains of people with dyslexia have been shown to differ from those of normal readers. Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare the two groups, and were able to associate the neurological differences found with different language difficulties within the dyslexic group.

Cyril Pernet, from the University of Edinburgh, worked with a team of researchers to compare the brains of 38 people with dyslexia to a model 'typical brain' created by combining the scans of 39 normal readers. In all cases, differences could be seen in either the right cerebellar declive or the right lentiform nucleus. These were associated with varying performance in language tests.

It is increasingly accepted that dyslexia is not a unique entity, but might reflect different neuro-cognitive pathologies. Researchers have been looking for a way to distinguish between different types of dyslexia for several years, and this research is among the first to show a direct link between brain structure and symptom severity. According to Pernet, "These results provide evidence for the existence of various subtypes of dyslexia characterized by different brain phenotypes. In addition, behavioral analyses suggest that these brain phenotypes relate to different deficits of automatization of language-based processes such as grapheme/phoneme correspondence and/or rapid access to lexicon entries".


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The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Cyril R Pernet, Jean Baptiste Poline, Jean Francois Demonet and Guillaume A Rousselet. Brain classification reveals the right cerebellum as the best biomarker of dyslexia. BMC Neuroscience, (in press) [link]

Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Neurological Differences Support Dyslexia Subtypes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090624193502.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2009, June 26). Neurological Differences Support Dyslexia Subtypes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090624193502.htm
BioMed Central. "Neurological Differences Support Dyslexia Subtypes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090624193502.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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