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Fuzzy Dampers Could Make Cars Quieter

Date:
June 26, 2009
Source:
Inderscience
Summary:
New research could offer a solution to one of the most annoying sounds on our roads -- brake squeal. There are lots of mechanical myths about what causes a car's brakes to produce that biting howl. The all too familiar piercing squeal is heard at road junctions and traffic lights the world over as drivers hit the brakes. But, understanding what causes brake squeal might help researchers find a way to stop it.

A special issue of the International Journal of Vehicle Safety could offer a solution to one of the most annoying sounds on our roads -- brake squeal.

There are lots of mechanical myths about what causes a car's brakes to produce that biting howl. The all too familiar piercing squeal is heard at road junctions and traffic lights the world over as drivers hit the brakes. But, understanding what causes brake squeal might help researchers find a way to stop it.

Some drivers say it's due to worn brake pads, garage mechanics often blame bits of grit on the pads, others suggests that it's rusty discs. But, scientists and engineers know better: "squeal in a disk brake is initiated by an instability due to the friction forces leading to self-excited vibrations."

Utz von Wagner and Stefan Schlagner of the Technische Universitδt Berlin, Germany, have developed a mathematical model that helps explain what physical conditions are needed for brake squeal to happen. Their model predicts how different braking setups affect the squeal frequency and perhaps the level of pedestrian annoyance caused by the brake noise. They have developed a rig to simulate braking and so allow engineers to test different approaches to preventing brake squeal.

Well, that's the scientific definition, but what can be done about this frictional instability?

Oliviero Giannini of the University of Rome 'La Sapienza', points out that despite a century of driving with brake squeal little progress has been made in combating this annoyance until now. He is developing the idea of a fuzzy damper that could one day suppress brake squeal altogether.

"Brake squeal is caused by vibrations induced by friction forces," explains Giannini. A damper that responds to the level of frictional forces and absorbs some of the energy, without interfering with braking, could prevent the kind of unstable vibrations in the brake disks that cause the high-pitched screeching.

Giannini has thus successfully modelled and tested the concept of a fuzzy damper for his braking test-rig and demonstrated that for this lab-based system, at least, brake squeal can be totally suppressed. Patent applications are underway and the next step is to test real braking systems with the fuzzy damper.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. O. Giannin. Squeal suppression through a tuned fuzzy damper: a numerical study. Int. J. Vehicle Design, 2009, 51, 105-123

Cite This Page:

Inderscience. "Fuzzy Dampers Could Make Cars Quieter." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090625074510.htm>.
Inderscience. (2009, June 26). Fuzzy Dampers Could Make Cars Quieter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090625074510.htm
Inderscience. "Fuzzy Dampers Could Make Cars Quieter." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090625074510.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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