Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Electronic Tracking System Can Help Diabetes Patient Care

Date:
July 14, 2009
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
An electronic system with personalized patient information shared by diabetes patients and their primary care providers improved diabetes care and clinical outcomes.

An electronic system with personalized patient information shared by diabetes patients and their primary care providers improved diabetes care and clinical outcomes, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

The study involved 511 patients and 46 family physicians and nurse-practitioners and offered web-based tools integrated with 5 different types of electronic health records, an automated telephone reminder system and a mailing of colour-coded materials to half the study sample. Sixty two per cent of patients improved with the intervention compared with 42.6% in the control group and intervention patients reported greater satisfaction with their diabetes care.

Diabetes affects approximately 7% of the populations of Canada and the US – about 23 million people – and costs $105 billion in direct annual healthcare costs. Most diabetes care is community-based, largely managed by primary care physicians.

The study is one of the first randomized trials to show success in community-based primary care and the first such trial in Canada.

"Despite the technical challenges for both patients and physicians, we have demonstrated that the care of a complex chronic disease can be improved with electronic tracking and decision support shared by family physician and patient," write Dr. Anne Marie Holbrook of McMaster University and coauthors.

The results of the study "provide strong evidence that complex research interventions can and should be implemented in community-based practices," say Dr. Richard Grant and Dr. Blackford Middleton of Harvard Medical School in a related commentary. The next steps are to create patient-centred rather than disease-focused systems to address a wide range of patient concerns and help clinical management of complex diseases outside of a visit to a doctor or nurse.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Electronic Tracking System Can Help Diabetes Patient Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706171456.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2009, July 14). Electronic Tracking System Can Help Diabetes Patient Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706171456.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Electronic Tracking System Can Help Diabetes Patient Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090706171456.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins