Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Veterinary Scientists' Work On Diagnostic, Intervention Tools For H1N1 Helps Human Health Lab, Too

Date:
August 18, 2009
Source:
Kansas State University
Summary:
If some day you are tested for the H1N1 virus without the painful prick of a needle, thank a pig -- and researchers who are connecting animal and human health.

If some day you are tested for the H1N1 virus without the painful prick of a needle, thank a pig -- and a team of Kansas State University researchers and their collaborators who are connecting animal and human health.

Related Articles


K-State professors Dick Hesse and Bob Rowland -- along with a research partner at Iowa State University -- are collaborating with Susan Wong, a scientist at the New York State Department of Health, on diagnostic and intervention tools for the H1N1 virus.

While Wong is working on the human health side, the other scientists are focused on aspects of the research that will benefit animal health, including the health of swine in Kansas. Hesse is an associate professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology and head of diagnostic virology in the K-State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Rowland is a K-State professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology. Their Iowa State collaborator, Jeffrey Zimmerman, is a professor of veterinary diagnostic and production animal medicine.

One of the ways these scientists' work intersects is in a method for identifying the H1N1 virus. At K-State, Rowland and Hesse are working on a diagnostic method for pigs that analyzes saliva rather than blood. Zimmerman developed a less invasive collection procedure for the pigs: The animals chew on a rope, from which saliva is collected.

"Just as we are developing noninvasive techniques to collect samples from animals, it provides the New York State health lab the opportunity to develop the same oral fluids technique for humans," Rowland said. "Using a saliva swab rather than a needle to draw blood works especially well for kids."

The K-State researchers also contribute to the human health side by providing Wong's lab with antigen targets and by validating test systems.

"We bring a lot to the table, but at the same time they bring a lot to us," Rowland said. "One of the nice things is we can study the virus in pigs and get the type of reagents and samples from which to develop the tests. You can't do that with people."

Such benefits to human health stem from K-State's efforts to help swine producers across Kansas. The K-Staters are developing multiplex system tests to profile swine herds and determine what's circulating, what the antibody response is, and with that knowledge help producers make sound management decisions.

"This standardized diagnostic testing is to help the citizens of Kansas," Hesse said. "We herd profile on the veterinary end of things, and you can consider the human population a herd you can profile as well."

Rowland said that some of the benefits of their testing system are that it provides more information, better accuracy and should be available to producers at a less expensive price.

"This is the next generation of diagnostic tests that will replace a lot of things we've done in the past," he said. "The bottom line is these producers have to be able to afford the tests we provide them," he said.

Healthy pigs mean successful producers, Hesse said.

"At the end of the day, these diagnostics help maintain the healthy agriculture economy of the state," Hesse said.

After diagnosing diseases in herds, the researchers said that their next goals are to help producers with surveillance and prevention.

"The same reagents we use for diagnostics are often the ones we use for vaccines, so we're not only looking at diagnosing something, we're always looking at the next stage," Rowland said.

Gary Anderson, who directs the K-State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, said that what sets apart Hesse, Rowland and many of their colleagues at K-State is their work at the bench nearly always translates into benefits for the field.

"These are hard-core scientists who are really interested in meeting real-world needs and taking the research from the bench to the field, and the K-State Veterinary Diagnostic Lab is doing that every single day by helping people in our state and nation."

The importance of the K-State researchers' efforts is magnified with diseases like the flu that humans share with other animals.

"This really gets back to the concept of one health, one medicine," Rowland said. "Veterinary and human medicine have a lot of interaction, especially on the infectious disease side, where we look at infectious agents that may circulate in both human and animal populations."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kansas State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Kansas State University. "Veterinary Scientists' Work On Diagnostic, Intervention Tools For H1N1 Helps Human Health Lab, Too." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090818130548.htm>.
Kansas State University. (2009, August 18). Veterinary Scientists' Work On Diagnostic, Intervention Tools For H1N1 Helps Human Health Lab, Too. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090818130548.htm
Kansas State University. "Veterinary Scientists' Work On Diagnostic, Intervention Tools For H1N1 Helps Human Health Lab, Too." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090818130548.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) Millions of monarch butterflies begin to descend onto Mexico as part of their annual migration south. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins